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SUM DAVID EAGLEMAN PDF

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Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives. Home · Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives.. . Author: David Eagleman Sum · Read more. Page 1. David Eagleman. “Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives”. Page 2. Page 3. David Eagleman's book "SUM: Forty Tales from the Afterlives".


Sum David Eagleman Pdf

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At once funny, wistful and unsettling, Sum is a dazzling exploration of unexpected afterlives—each presented as a vignette that offers a stunning. Ebook download any format Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives Unlimited Free Book Details Author: David Eagleman Pages: Binding. Also by David Eagleman. Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives. Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain. Why the Net Matters: Six Easy Ways to Avert the Collapse.

Tell us about the title.

I chose Sum for three reasons. Third, the point of this book is that the whole is greater than the sum of the parts.

What is that something bigger? They have no doubt about the absolute truth of their story, even though every other adherent in every other religion shares that same certainty and knows that all other religions are patently untrue.

The important thing should be to explore and celebrate the vast possibilities. The mutual exclusivity of the stories in Sum are designed to allow this. The aim of this book is to swing a flashlight around the possibility space. So do you believe any of the stories in Sum could be true? None are meant to be serious proposals.

The only serious proposal is the emergent message of the book: But do you consider any of the stories in Sum more probable than any others? They are all equally improbable. Do you believe in anything?

Sum: Forty Tales from the Afterlives - Chapters 1 through 4 Summary & Analysis

I believe in possibility. Is that compatible with your scientific career? It is the heart of a scientific career. Real science always operates by holding lots of interesting possibilities in mind and working to see which one is more supported by the data. Yes, maybe someday. I am not a mysterian, who believes that science will never be able to shed light on the deep questions.

And science over the past years has been tremendously successful. But in the end, when you reach the end of the pier of everything we know in science, you find that it has taken us only part way, and beyond that all you see is uncharted water.

Beyond the end of the pier lies all the rest, all the mystery about our deeply strange existence. The equivalence of mass and energy, dark matter, multiple spatial dimensions, how to build consciousness from pieces and parts, what live and death are about, and so on. There may be some domains that are beyond the tools of science—perhaps temporarily, perhaps always.

The truth is that good scientists are among the most open-minded people. Science is nothing but careful thinking, and careful thinking encourages an appreciation of the complexity of the world, and this complexity encourages us to maintain several possibilities in our head at once.

In a single lifetime, we may have no way to disambiguate these possibilities.

Chapters 1 through 4 Summary and Analysis

A scientist may tend to favor one story over the others, but will always be careful to concede uncertainty and maintain a willingness to change the balance with new, incoming information. As an example, there are two very different interpretations about the reality underlying quantum physics.

It is possible that there will be no way to ever know which is correct, or if instead some entirely new theory is correct. And that ambiguity is accepted as part of the enormity of the mysteries we face. Those are often the terms of the agreement we have with Mother Nature.

Little Atoms podcast interviews David Eagleman

Are you personally an atheist? It depends what you mean by that. As a teenager I was an atheist. I realize now that my drive to talk with people about atheism was nothing more than a desire to get them to admit that something else could be possible other than the view that they absorbed from their parents or their community or their culture.

Brains in different locations are exposed to different contexts, and they come to believe the local stories with equal passion and fervor. After childhood indoctrination people will vigorously defend their story against all the other stories, which seem to them fundamentally ridiculous. For many people, this connection to the numinous is an important part of their lives.

Do you think some form of religion is possible? I think most scientists are, in some sense, religious.

But not in the traditional way. As the philosophers Russell and Whitehead pointed out, spiritual impulses should be built upon the bedrock of what we already know. We know quite a bit about the size of the cosmos at this point, and quite a bit about the biological algorithms in our bodies, and the strange quantum behavior of atoms, and so on.

So the idea is to use this knowledge as a springboard for any reasonable religion, instead of books written millennia ago by people who never had the opportunity to know about DNA, extra-solar planets, bacterial infection, information theory, electricity, the Big Bang and Big Crunch, or even other cultures or literatures or landscapes.

Many traditional stories are beautiful, and they often crystallize hard-won wisdom. But in my opinion, the traditional religions are likely to be too small-thinking to possibly be correct. We know so much more now.

So would you call yourself an agnostic? As it is commonly used, I find the term agnostic weak. Do you call yourself anything? I call myself a possibilian.

Read An Excerpt. Eagleman presents his many scenarios of what might be or what could be in the afterlife.

The author takes the image of the creator to the extremes. In one narrative, "The Microbe," he describes god as the size of a microbe, so small that he does not know that we exist.

In another tale, the reader is told that god is a Giantess who is so large that it is virtually impossible to communicate with her. She does not know we are there!

Many of the stories focus on the consciousness of those entering the afterlife. For example, in "Graveyard of the Gods," afterlife is for man and for everything created or made by man. Therefore, anything that man invented has an afterlife.

Everything from toasters to grand pianos have a place in the afterlife. But afterlife is also for the literary and mythic creations of man.

All the gods that man ever created in stories have a place in the afterlife. In another story, those arriving in the afterlife are met with the daunting challenge of meeting versions of themselves - what they could have been - in comparison of their own filtered views of themselves.

In several stories god, or the creator, is seen as anything but all powerful. In "Reins," god is perplexed when a committee, urged on by angels, finds him incompetent of deciding who should go to heaven and who should go to hell.In the afterlife, you are treated to a generous opportunity: All the gods that man ever created in stories have a place in the afterlife.

After childhood indoctrination people will vigorously defend their story against all the other stories, which seem to them fundamentally ridiculous.

But it serves as the punishment for your sins, a Promethean entrails-pecking moment, crouching half-horse halfman, with the knowledge that you cannot appreciate the destination without knowing the starting point; you cannot revel in the simplicity unless you remember the alternatives.

Science is nothing but careful thinking, and careful thinking encourages an appreciation of the complexity of the world, and this complexity encourages us to maintain several possibilities in our head at once.