resourceone.info Technology Dongri To Mumbai Pdf

DONGRI TO MUMBAI PDF

Monday, December 2, 2019


Dongri to Dubai is the first ever attempt to chronicle the history of the Mumbai mafia. It is the story of notorious gangsters like Haji Mastan, Karim Lala. Dongri To Dubai Six Decades Of The Mumbai Mafia Pdf Download -> resourceone.info dohefrekifryba. Jubin Chheda says "This book builds the pedigree of crime that. File formats: ePub, PDF, Kindle, Audiobook, mobi, ZIP. Download >> Dongri to Dubai: Six Decades of the Mumbai Mafia. k views · View 2 Upvoters.


Dongri To Mumbai Pdf

Author:AYANNA LOVELLETTE
Language:English, Spanish, Indonesian
Country:Austria
Genre:Religion
Pages:786
Published (Last):06.07.2016
ISBN:385-6-76425-682-3
ePub File Size:30.59 MB
PDF File Size:14.33 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:41967
Uploaded by: ROCHELL

Read "Dongri to Dubai Six Decades of Mumbai Mafia" by S. Hussain Zaidi available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get RS. off your first purchase. Tracing the history of Mumbai, historian and researcher Sharada Dwivedi writes that the area was once a flatland and Dongri was a hill; there used to be a. Dongri to Dubai: Six Decades of the Mumbai Mafia is a book by former investigative journalist Hussain Zaidi. The book traces the evolution of the Mumbai mafia.

The Life Tree. The Girl I Last Loved. Smita Kaushik. Byculla to Bangkok. Devdutt Pattanaik. Ravi Subramanian. The Siege. Cathy Scott-Clark. Rajdeep Sardesai. The time machine. Kent Mauresmo. Virginia Wild. Leaders Who Changed the World. Gordon Kerr. Richard F. Tales from India Global Classics. Rudyard Kipling. Mumbai Avengers. Shree Paradkar. The Style Diary of a Bollywood Diva. Kareena Kapoor. Suddha Murty. Krishna Udayasankar. Jagmohan Bhanver. Godfathers of Crime.

Sheela Raval. A History of India. Romila Thapar. The World's Best Boyfriend. Durjoy Datta. Bombay Rains, Bombay Girls. Anirban Bose. Manju Gupta. Come On Inner Peace. Sachin Garg. India After Gandhi: The History of the World's Largest Democracy.

Ramachandra Guha. Mrs Funnybones. Twinkle Khanna.

Stay Tuned for Regular Updates on Latest Trends!

The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci. Leonardo Da Vinci. Your Complete Forecast Horoscope: Bejan Daruwalla. Welcome to Your Brain. Sandra Aamodt. Prem Chand. Munshi Premchand. Michael Bar-Zohar. Abraham Lincoln. Lord Charnwood. I Too Had a Love Story. Ravinder Singh.

INDIA New Media Wing. I have always been pretty eager to read about the Mumbai Underworld, and S Hussain Zaidi has somehow helped me alot in quenching my thirst about the mumabi mafia through his earlier books Black Friday and The Mafia Queens of Mumbai. I picked up 'Dongri to Dubai' with lots of hope,thinking that it is going to be a great sequel to the Mumbai Mafia trilogy,sadly, the I found the book below my expectation levels and here are the reasons for that: The book is repetitive at quite a number of instan I have always been pretty eager to read about the Mumbai Underworld, and S Hussain Zaidi has somehow helped me alot in quenching my thirst about the mumabi mafia through his earlier books Black Friday and The Mafia Queens of Mumbai.

The book is repetitive at quite a number of instances.

Same paragraphs are repeated more than once. It feels quite irritating if you have to read the same paragraph which has appeared two pages earlier.

Some of the anecdotes used in this book are already mentioned in 'The Mafia Queens of Mumbai'. Someone who has read that book wouuld very easily find this out. Most importantly, I found that Mr. Zaidi has tried pretty hard to portray Dawood Ibrahim as a larger than life character. Glorification of crime can be disastrous in the long term and the gullible youth can find an inspiration to venture into the wrong path after reading such unnecessary portrayals of someone who is a dreaded criminal.

Zaidi has tried to portray Dawood as a "Muslim" don by dividng the mumbai mafia on communal lines. Reading the book, I felt that Mr. Zaidi is trying to convey that "Muslim" Mafia is far better organized, eqipped and efficient than the Hindu Mafia. For me, crime and criminals have no religion, so such divisions along communal lines are uncalled for. I am eagerly awaiting the fourth book of Mr. Zaidi i. Regards, Siddahrth View 1 comment.

Jun 21, Ranjan rated it it was amazing Shelves: A book like this was long over due. It is a veritable encyclopedia on the Bombay underworld written by the best amongst the lot - Mr. Along with Shantaram and Maximum City, this book attempts to define a bewildering megalopolis that defies any easy classification Meticulously researched over a period of six years,it draws, for the first time, not only the careers of the most dreaded gangsters like Dawood and A book like this was long over due.

Meticulously researched over a period of six years,it draws, for the first time, not only the careers of the most dreaded gangsters like Dawood and Karim Lala and Haji Mastan and their contemporaries and predecessors , but also delves into their personal lives that range from their love affairs to their innermost flaws and fears.

The book rises above regular reportage and attains a maturity that is rarely seen amongst others of the ilk. View all 6 comments. Apr 10, Lit Bug rated it liked it Shelves: This was my first read about mafia - and while I was deeply interested in how Mumbai gave the mafia a chance to flourish, I also noticed asking myself a crucial question more frequently during the latter half of my read.

What should a nonfiction on mafia ideally convey? Or should it be a critical venture where, by exposing the murky machine This was my first read about mafia - and while I was deeply interested in how Mumbai gave the mafia a chance to flourish, I also noticed asking myself a crucial question more frequently during the latter half of my read. Or should it be a critical venture where, by exposing the murky machinery of the underworld, the effects of criminal activities on society should also be commented upon, along with an enquiry into the aspects which drew people to crime?

Reflecting on the exciting, information-laden, action-packed narrative I have just read, I find myself rooting for the latter. A crime nonfiction, especially one of this scale, ought not to be solely about chronology; rather, it should be a social inquiry into the nature of crime and criminals, along with the socio-economic and political machinations that allow crime to thrive.

My experience with this book has been a heady one — for one, I had only a vague idea about the six decades of mafia in Mumbai, mostly through popular consensus, some current affairs and a spate of unreliable Bollywood references on various forgotten gangsters. I took up this book to see if I could link these all into a coherent view of the history of mafia. Some of the most commonly known and feared gangsters, such as Haji Mastan, Varadarajan, Dawood, Abu Salem, Chhota Rajan, Chhota Shakeel and Manya Surve — some of them have become legendary names, while some of them have had their three-hours of fame in celluloid.

Most of them have been entirely forgotten. The account is extremely interesting — it explores how economic policies and political scenarios unwittingly opened up avenues for gangs to flourish. Although it comprehensively covers all major gangsters, it is more Dawood-centric, and it mostly follows a chronological account of only that gang which Dawood was to first join and then take over later. Since the cover explicitly depicts only Dawood, it is to be expected that all roads lead to D Company.

For beginners who have no idea about the details of the six decades of mafia, it is a lovely book — chronicling the rise of mafia, their operations, the involvement of police at various stages, apart from the usual politician-lobbying. The latter part of the book concentrates more on Dawood and his changing fortunes — and the fortunes of the people around him — Chhota Rajan, Chhota Shakeel, Abu Salem — as also the state of Bollywood when it got unwillingly embroiled with D Company.

A little more light is shed on how the Liberation policy of which liberalized the economy showered riches on the mafia, how communal riots, the Babri Mosque demolition resulted into the 10 serial bomb blasts in Mumbai in But 0 stars for everything else.

What I cringe at is the tone of the text. Every single paragaraph reeks of that uninhibited admiration for gangsters. Maybe Zaidi is afraid of Dawood — because he fleetingly mentions every bold journalist being murdered by them. It is a sort of glamorized, smooth, glib, charming, honeyed romantic account.

Instead of portraying the blood, filth and dirt that mafia really is, it is a sentimental account, which is a gross, inhuman injustice to the brave people who lost their lives to these ruffians.

Wow, try telling me a notorious don had no idea what he was providing the logistics support for! I feel neither sympathy for them, nor pity. I only find myself singeing in fury and helplessness. These people were criminals, not bloody victims. I give a full ZERO star for the intentions of the book.

View all 12 comments. Mar 21, Salil Kanitkar rated it liked it Shelves: In my opinion, the second option is better - but there is absolutely nothing wrong in going with the first.

What a Non-fiction book about Mafia should Not do is glorification of the criminals, the romanticization of the power that life of crime brings and to Not cater to the morbid fascination of violence, gang-war, police shootings etc.

And doing exactly that, I believe, is inexcusable!

It is because of this, in my opinion, that Dongri to Dubai by S. Hussain Zaidi fails miserably. It is a dizzyingly fast paced thriller-ride that chronicles the Mumbai mafia starting right from - immediately after the Indian Independence - upto His rise from a poor family with 11 siblings and a respectable cop father to a street thug - then to a Police pawn - and finally to the numero uno of Mumbai underworld.

You feel livid after learning about the rampant corruption in Maharashtra politicians, in country-wide politicians in fact, the many opportunities to nab Dawood gone wasted. One of the most infuriating story in the book is that during a gang-war related shootout by Dawood's men in Mumbai's JJ Hospital, they literally used a politician's "laal-batti" ambassador to escape!

However, even an iota of glorification of crime, even a subtle hint, in a purely non-fictional book is not good. Dongri to Dubai actually goes one step further. No sane person would buy this reasoning.

The book mentions in gory details all the gang-war related shootouts - but the innocent people who lost their lives in the process deserve no more than a mere mention.

Anyway, I am giving the book three stars. But a big thumbs down for the wrong overall tone of the book. View all 4 comments. Jun 20, Nazrul Islam rated it it was amazing Shelves: Sep 21, Kali Srikanth rated it really liked it Shelves: Power n.: Ability to cause or prevent an action, make things happen ; the discretion to act or not act.

Opposite of disability. A Society is made up of people from various cultures, creeds, colors and walks of life.

Within societies are poor, middle class, and very prosperous individuals and families. Society has its own government, rules to abide by, laws to follow, courts and other controlling factors to make people who live therein, safe.

Dongri To Dubai : Six Decades of The Mumbai Mafia

People have careers, jobs, schools, commercial and resi Power n.: People have careers, jobs, schools, commercial and residential areas that facilitate this whole idea of society. Mumbai then Bombay is one such cosmopolitan society which happily invites all "types" of people and offers every one of them who had conviction, to make fortune for them self.

City of dreams. But, there are certain individuals or group of individuals who stayed above all of this, meaning rules ungoverned, laws broken, fear instilled and chaos created which is, literally dictating this very society to kneel on all fours before them. And how did they manage to do it? Which may ever be the reason for their entry into this one way game, these men started, rose and finally, they doomed.

And this is the book which profoundly discusses about these men who controlled, manipulated, influenced, exploited or even to a certain extent balanced , the very word and the world of Power.

Soon information just rolls page after page shifting from one place to other, from one influential person to another in Mumbai shaping the 60 years of Mafia. People came, people ruled, people died, the end.

Join Kobo & start eReading today

I don't know but clearly which he alone possessed and his adversaries lacked. Yes, May be he is the kingpin of the whole game but I remind you he is on the other side of the law. Apart from this, book has its own inadequacies, especially towards the ending.

And there are places it gets too dramatic where Author desperately tries to prove that he managed to meet childhood associates of Dawood and churn exclusive info which he called "scenes" in acknowledgements section like his movements, talking style, smoking habits etc. A complete picture. If you have same thoughts like I do, pick this book. View 2 comments.

Dongri To Dubai : Six Decades of The Mumbai Mafia

Oct 02, Arun Divakar rated it liked it. There is a morbid fascination we associate with the darker shades of the society who are referred to as the 'underworld'. Seeing things from such an angle has also helped me understand the immense popularity movies like The Godfather trilogy, Scarface and Goodfellas have enjoyed. While most people cannot or do not want to grow rich in this fashion, they relish watching from the sidelines as a small section of their society does things by their own rules.

Like any other nation of the world, India There is a morbid fascination we associate with the darker shades of the society who are referred to as the 'underworld'. Like any other nation of the world, India too has spawned its own version of the mafia. While the other states and locations have been the spokes, Mumbai has always been the hub. Needless to say, the world's most notorious gangster: Dawood Ibrahim has been Mumbai's contribution. This book is a chronicle of how mafia grew and evolved into a corporate behemoth that at one point was a parallel governing system in itself.

The storyline spans over 60 years and starts with the smaller knife-wielding pickpockets of yore and slowly paving the way for the big boys. Smuggling - whether it be gold,narcotics or imported goods was the golden corridor that made the fortunes of many a don in India.

Certain names which are household property in terms of current affairs are all given flesh and blood caricatures in the book. From these old stalwarts, the story moves to the blue eyed wonder boy named Dawood who gave the mafia a fresh new coat of paint.

Text Widget

From gang and turf wars that left a trail of corpses behind, Dawood built a business conglomerate that would rival even the most advanced multinationals. With affiliations,mergers and acquisitions the gang of erstwhile thugs grew into what was known as the D-company. Along the way, Dawood left India for safer haven in Dubai. The game shifts gears here for with intervention from intelligence agencies abroad the gang moves from strictly business deals to trying their hands in logistic support for terrorism.

The results of this have been two of the most devastating terror attacks that India has witnessed. The boy from Dongri who built a sprawling criminal empire had transfomed to something else entirely.

This is what the book encompasses. It offers a bird's eye view of the counter culture that has deeply affected the moral fabric of India. For all the interesting subject material in the book, I did not find the author to be totally unbiased.

There was of course the starry eyed wonderment reserved for Dawood and this sometimes made the storyline a bit biased. Also, it is only towards the end of the book that any real importance is given to the policing system that finally brought the mafia to its knees. Until the final few chapters, they are pretty much sidelined. The pace of the book however makes up for all this and if I were to tell you that the content of this book has already given rise to two movies, you would get the picture.

The impact mafia has on popular culture is rather immense. For instance, a movie named 'Nayagan' which was loosely inspired by the story of Varadarajan Muthaliar aka Vardha bhai has been hailed a masterpiece the World across.

It is one of the two movies from India chosen by Time as the World's best with the other being 'Pather Panchali'! A quick read and an above average one at that. Mar 31, Hyderali rated it it was amazing. Hussain Zaidi is master in detailing the life of underworld don Dawood Ibrahim. Really, his hardwork of 6 years definitely made this book worth reading. I read S. I felt that every gangster portray in this book deserve a full 90mins of movie to be made on him. I'm really looking forward to his other books i.

Jul 29, Shipra Trivedi rated it really liked it. Dongri To Dubai is not just a book. The book simply tells you the stories of local mafias and how they operated their networks with the help of some police officials, politicians, celebs and influenced personalities.

The author has narrated very interesting stories of almost all the ganglords who indirectly ruled the economic center of India. As far as storyline is concerned, it is Dongri To Dubai is not just a book. What I cringe at is the tone of the text.

Every single paragaraph reeks of that uninhibited admiration for gangsters. Maybe Zaidi is afraid of Dawood — because he fleetingly mentions every bold journalist being murdered by them. It is a sort of glamorized, smooth, glib, charming, honeyed romantic account. Instead of portraying the blood, filth and dirt that mafia really is, it is a sentimental account, which is a gross, inhuman injustice to the brave people who lost their lives to these ruffians.

Wow, try telling me a notorious don had no idea what he was providing the logistics support for! I feel neither sympathy for them, nor pity. I only find myself singeing in fury and helplessness.

These people were criminals, not bloody victims.Ian Cardozo Param Vir: After his release, Varda spent another week or two laying low, assimilating the fact that he, a small time crook, was now muscleman for the powerful, rising Haji Mastan.

No Handcuffs unravels the mysteries of decades of crime and political incident. Would you like us to take another look at this review? Jagmohan Bhanver. Arun Gawli and Chhota Rajan, your rivals, who are after your life. Seven years in the making, Sacred Games is an epic of exceptional richness and power.