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38 BASIC JOSEKI PDF

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Elementary Go Series - Volume 2 - 38 Basic Joseki - Free ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online for free. By Kiyoshi Kosugi and . Elementary Go Series - 38 Basic Joseki Vol. 2 Shakespeare Studies Vol. Read more Model Selection (Lecture Notes Monograph Series, vol 38). DOWNLOAD PDF. Report this file. Description. Download Elementary Go Series - Volume 2 - 38 Basic Joseki Free in pdf format.


38 Basic Joseki Pdf

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38 Basic Joseki (Elementary Go Series, Vol. 2) (Beginner and Elementary Go Books) by Kosugi Kiyoshi, James Davies PDF, ePub eBook. enter the corner at and for example, initiate the joseki up to black . is a basic joseki move it is very hard to say when this move is Page Sensei's Library, page: 38 Basic Joseki, keywords: Joseki, Books & Publications. SL is a large WikiWikiWeb about the game of Go (Baduk.

He must play 6 right after White 5 if he wants White to answer it at 7. It is futile for Black to play 1 after Dia. White will reply at 2, building a wall which works beautifully with his shimari.

Of course Black is getting territory too, but not as much as White. Black turns out to be almost completely wasted. White could even apply this sequence in answer to Black 6 in Dia. Sometimes White is unable to extend up the right side, and then he must change his tactics accordingly. In this situation, for example, White should jump out into the center with 5 instead of playing a, making a quick escape.

Black takes the vital point at 6. If White were allowed to play there he would make good shape for his stones while destroying a lot of Blacks lower side territory. White 7 establishes room for two eyes on the right side. When he jumps out to 5, White need not fear this Black 6. Even if he is unable to capture the cutting stone in shicho, White 9 at 10 , he can make shape as shown, and Black begins to look very weak, while the lower side is still open. The loss of costs White very little, and if Black cuts at a and captures another stone, again it is not so important.

Here is one common opening pattern in which the joseki we have just been studying is often played. Black 13 is a big point, although Black a would be big, too.

The reason that Black 13 is so big is that it prepares for an invasion at b. Of course White can defend with c, but then Black will play a, happy with the exchange of 13 for c, so maybe White should play 14 at a. That 1.

It is not so from above with underneath at 5, White. White 2 here is the correct answer to Black 1. Now White is ready to play either a or b to connect his position. If Black plays 3 at c White will play a, and if Black plays 3 at d White will play b. At the same time, White e has become a strong move for later on. If Black is determined to make trouble he can play tsuke at 3, leading to a ko. White can play 8 at a or b.

Black had better be sure of his ko threats before starting this fight. If White lacks ko threats he cannot play 4 and 6 in the last diagram, but must submit to being cut in two as shown here. He can still fight in his separated shape, but it will be hard for him. Thus White 1 is quite large, for after it the invasion at a is not likely to pose any threat at all.

In conclusion This is a simple and satisfying joseki for Black, since he gets a strong corner while Whites shape is still open to attack.

But on the other hand, White comes out of it with a higher position, and it is easier for him to develop a really large territory than it is for Black, so there is nothing unfair about it.

There are many opening situations where it is a reasonable choice for both Players. No variation is possible in Black 4 and White 5. This joseki is known as the nadare, which means avalanche in Japanese. It does not stop here, for Black has a serious weakness in the cutting point at a, while White is vulnerable to a hane at b. Black has four choices for his next play; a, b, c, and d. We shall concentrate on Black a and b.

Black 6: simplest variation Dia. Black defends his weak point at 6, and White does likewise at 7. After Black 8, White has good plays at a and b, and he can also play tenuki.

With this shimari in the lower left corner it is a good idea for White to make the kaketsugi at 9, working toward a large territory across the lower side. With the joseki turned on its side, this is the same situation as before, except that White has only a single stone in the other corner. White 9 is not a bad move, but now Black can easily make a position on the side with 10 and So White may prefer to make a play like 9 here.

Black can attack with 10, but the fight is a fair one, both the black and the white groups being weak. White must be careful not to play 9 too close to the lower right corner. If he plays it here, Black will just push out with 10 and Now it is obvious that there is too little territory below White 9 and too much open space above it. The other key point for White is at 9.

This play enlarges Whites wall and, by preventing Black a, reduces Blacks prospects on the right side.

If Black answers White 9, he should do so at If Black plays 10 here he leaves a serious weak point at a which White can exploit if he has a stone further up on the right side. Do you see the relation of a to White b? If Black fails to answer , White can play kikashi at 1.

Blacks best response is 2, but this exchange by itself hinders Black in the expansion of his territory along the right side. Black attacks with 6 and White counter attacks with 7, forming the so-called small nadare joseki.

White 9, threatening both a and b, is the key to this variation. Black 10 threatens to capture all the white stones, and White 11 defends. Black 12 is a good tesuji and Black 16 takes the corner, but the cutting point at a remains. White cuts and makes a position for himself on the right side, and after this the joseki continues with a fight involving the weak black stones in the center. One idea for Blacks next move is a. After White 11, this is another possible variation.

What happens if White plays nobi with 11? The feasibility of this move depends on a shicho. Black can crawl out at 12, and when White cuts at 13 Black attacks with 14, 16, and If the shicho works, White loses everything.

If White plays 13 at 16, then Black 13 captures the corner stones, and this is not so good for White either. So if the shicho favors Black, White 11 is impossible, but on the other hand if the shicho favors White, this diagram is not very good for Black.

When the shicho is against Black, he must play as shown here, taking the corner. Next White should take the vital point at a, and of course b is his sente on the right side. Black 6 here forms the so-called o-nadare, big nadare , joseki. This move is not as aggressive as the hane at a, so White will often answer it by playing tenuki.

If White does continue with the joseki, then this diagram shows the simplest way. Another idea is to exchange 7 for 8 and then tenuki, without playing 9. Finally there is this double hane variation, which leaves Black with good plays at a and b. Perhaps you can figure out what happens if White does not answer Black a.

In conclusion White is offering Black a modest amount of corner and side territory in return for a wall, basically a simple idea, but there are many complicated variations to the nadare joseki, including a whole family arising from the o-nadare which we have not mentioned.

The sequence up to Black 5 is the usual joseki, although there is a difficult variation, not to be found in this book, in which Black plays 3 at a.

After Black 5, White can continue by playing b or c, or he can leave the shape as it is. We shall look at all three of these possibilities, as well as a variation in which Black plays 5 at c. Lets start with the two ways of playing White 6. White 6: first choice Dia.

The tsuke at 6 secures the corner territory. You may be impressed with Whites large profit in this sequence, but Black has sente, if White fails to play 10 then Black can play there himself and completely encircle Whites corner , and strength to use on the right side and in the center.

Whites position is not solid: Black can play a, threatening to continue with b. The idea behind this White 6 is to build a wall over the lower side, and after White 8 Black typically makes some move on the lower side to reduce the amount of white territory there.

Before doing so, he may push White a bit farther, Black a, White b. White can still play c later on to take the corner. Instead of 8 in Dia. The sequence may continue this way, although 13 at a, to take sente , and 15 at b are other possibilities.

White has a higher wall than before, but Black is also stronger, and he may be able to put Black 9 to use later.

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If White lets Black have the next play after the basic joseki, then Black will play the tsuke at 1, and White 2 to 8 are the correct response. In this sequence, which is not finished, if Black plays 7 at 8 then White will play 8 at 7, and although the ensuing semeai in the corner may be difficult, if played correctly it ends in Blacks defeat.

Continuing from the last diagram, Black captures two stones in shicho. White is confined to a small corner, but since he gets to play a shicho-breaking move in the upper right corner, he is not so badly off. If the shicho does not work, Black can still confine White with these plays.

Here is one situation in which Black should play 5 instead of c, for if he plays c and gets into Dia. This variation of the joseki continues with White cutting at 6 and taking the corner. Black has sente and can build territory on the right side, and from he can easily invade the lower side.

White 10 is a tesuji in this shape, and Black 11 an important kikashi, making a Whites gote. You may wonder why White doesnt play 10 here. After all, doesnt that allow him to take sente? Yes, but then Black can play 1 and 3 here sente , which do terrible damage to the corner. In conclusion This simple joseki, which is a favorite with the famous professional player Sakata, can occur not only as shown in the corner, but anywhere along the side of the board, so its basic moves are well worth learning.

Sometimes White plays tenuki after it, but then a second attacking move at a, or thereabouts, makes it difficult for him to form eye space on the lower side gracefully. Therefore White usually continues with 3 and 5, after which this joseki has three variations. Black can play b. This Black 6 is suitable for building territory on the right side, since it leaves Black with no weak points.

If White fails to extend to, or in the direction of, 7, then again Black can attack at a. Black 8 and 10 are consistent with Black 6, and are typical follow-up moves to this joseki. Later on, Black can play kikashi with 1, flattening out Whites territory on the lower side while expanding his own area.

This Black 6 is more suitable for attack and is especially good when Black already has stones on the sides, as in this diagram. The idea is to keep White weak by interfering with his eye space along the lower edge.

In this particular situation White might extend on the fourth line to 7, so as to make a quick march into the center at a next. The drawback of Black 6 is that it leaves the possibility of White b, which threatens White c, but with his weak group on the lower side to look after. White may never get a chance to exploit this weakness.

The original keima, Black , is thought to be a good way to start the attack, in line with the general principle of not playing in contact with the stones to be attacked.

The tsuke at Black 2 is much less effective, for White can make excellent shape by following the sequence up to In comparison with the last diagram Black has made more corner profit, but White is already out into the center, Black is looking very weak, and the right side is still open to White a. Here is one case in which, after White 5, Black should play neither a nor 7, but should play 6 to help his stone.

White now plays 7 in the corner, to keep Black from taking that point and also preparing to play b and capture two stones, but Black can defend his position with 8. This is much better for him than White 5, Black a, White c.

There are other ideas in this situation: White might be inclined to play 3 at c to attack at once, or for that matter Black might play 2 at 6, to forestall such action. Maybe we are pointing out the obvious, but it would be a mistake for White to try to counter- attack with 7 in this diagram, for then Black would defend his shape with 8, leaving both White 7 and the three stones in the corner weak.

Aggressive action often starts slowly like this; when you appreciate that fact you will have learned something about go.

It has three purposes: it prevents White from making another attack on the corner, it makes ready to put pressure on White 1, and it prepares for a wide extension on the lower side. White usually answers it, if at all, by extending up the right side to a, b. Here is an example of one kind of position in which the diagonal play is particularly necessary. White has a solid fortress in the upper right corner, and Black 1 is urgently needed to keep the white territory on the right side from growing too large.

In this sequence White makes his most ambitious defense, but Black has brought the situation under control. In this case White 2 at a would be far too timid. White b would be better, but with the strength he has in the upper right, White should try for the greatest possible territory by playing 2 as shown. Dia 2. If Black fails to make the diagonal play, then White will land on the vital point at 1, and his territory takes on gigantic proportions. There are two ways for him to attack.

White plays tenuki Dia. If White plays tenuki after in this position, Black will press him with 1. Whites strength in the upper right goes completely to waste, and Black has a wall to use for building territory over the lower side. This is not at all good for White.

Lets take a closer look at Black 1 and White 2. Black has many ways to proceed from this exchange. We have just shown a; b and c are similar, and d and e are other possibilities. Black may also play tenuki. The exchange of 1 for 2 by itself is usually good for him.

If White makes the next play after 2, he should play a. Here Black 1 and 3 are appropriate. Because of the nearness of Black there is no sense in playing 1 at 2 to build a wall.

If Black pushes through and cuts, White will usually capture the cutting stone, making good shape on the outside. Black has the corner, but he also has gote.

This is not bad for Whitenote the endgame point left for him at a. It is possible for White to resist Black 3 with White 4, but is not really so smart of him to do so. Even though he can fight a little bit on the outside with , he will soon have to play a to live in the corner. Sometimes Black may want to attack from the side instead of playing as in Dia. Here is one likely setting for such a move. Against this Black 1, White could run out at 3 if he had any chance of counterattacking, but Black might get to play a and White could find himself fighting a running battle without any base on the side.

It may be better for him to look for eye space than just to run away into the center, and if so, he should play 2. Black can confine him with 3, but he lives comfortably with 4 and 6. Whereas in Dia.

If White defends on the right side at 2, then Black can extend toward the shimari with 3. If White plays 2 on the lower side, then Black can attack on the right side at a. Whites four-line extension to may look unsafe, but if Black invades at 1, White has 2 and 4 to play, which give Black the cut at a to worry about.

If he plays 5 to defend against it, then White answers at 6, which opens up the possibility of a connection underneath at b. Considering that there is still room for White to extend upwards from to c, he is in no danger. It would be better for Black first to play c and then think about 1. In conclusion Although most of the joseki stemming from the kogeima kakari involve squeeze plays and are postponed to the next chapter, the diagonal move is of basic importance, absolutely necessary in situations like Dia.

Black can simply defend the corner at 2. After White 3, his corner is larger and safer, and has more potential for development, than Whites side position, so White 1 is reserved for situations where White has a special need to occupy the right side. Of course in those situations Black may want to answer White 1 by playing at or around 3, but then White has an easy way to handle the corner, as we shall see in section The ogeima kakari is understandable in this position, although it is at least temporarily out of style.

White 1 and 3 do something to reduce the effectiveness of Blacks shimari in the upper right corner, but Black can still make a good extension to 4. If he does not play 4, then White will approach closer at a, after which Black can neither make much territory in front of his shimari nor attack White. After 4, however, Black has various strong-arm tactics to use against Whites two stones. He can hit them from underneath by playing Black 1, making profit on the edge while attacking.

Or he can hit them from the outside, looking for profit in the center. Black 1 to 7 in this diagram would be appropriate if there were an extension like on the board. This time White uses 1 and 3 to attack on the right side.

There is a good reason for his playing 3 on the fourth line instead of the third. If 3 is played on the third line, Black will lose no time in striking with 4. After 6 his stones have better shape than they could possibly get in Dia.

If White played 3 correctly at 5 and Black played 4, White would answer with a, not 3. If after the basic joseki White advances on Blacks corner with 1 here, Black 2 is a good reply. It is not that Blacks eye shape is endangered, but if White were allowed to play at 2 himself, he could make territory in the center, and Black could not attack. In conclusion The ogeima kakari looks rather lukewarm so far. Whites real intention is usually to provoke a squeeze play, and then he has some good maneuvers, which we are coming to in section In this chapter we come to the joseki in which Black stops that extension with a squeeze play.

Squeeze plays are particularly often used against the kogeima kakari, White 1 in Dia.

Black 2 in Dia. Which of these is best in any given situation is a hard questionthe choice may be more a matter of taste than of anything else. Black a and b are the oldest, and the most thoroughly studied. Black c was introduced by Dosaku, a famous Japanese professional go player, around The squeeze plays on the fourth line are the creations of the present century, in fact, they did not become really popular until the post-World-War II era.

Black e, the newest, was not much played until a year or two ago. To keep this chapter from being longer than it is, we will concentrate on Black 2 in Dia. Sections 14 to 16 contain brief surveys of the joseki starting with Black a, d, and c. Black b is too much like Black 2 to need a separate section, and Black e is too new for us to be able to say much about.

There are no major gaps in our coverage of joseki, and we hope that our explanations are clear enough for even beginners to understand. With the exception of chapter four, we have limited ourselves to those joseki in which one player plays a stone in the corner, and before he has a chance to reinforce it with a second stone, his opponent moves in after him.

The first stone ordinarily goes on one of these five points: We shall stop at the four-five point because, although it is not necessarily bad to start farther out from the corner, it is rather unusual, so there are no joseki built specifically around such moves. The reader of this, or any other joseki book, may be dismayed at the large number of variations it contains.

Let him be reassured that he need not worry about forgetting them; in fact, it is a good idea to forget them. Too much dependence on rote learning of joseki stifles a players imagination, and blinds his overall vision of the board. It is best to remember pieces of. Joseki books, like other books, should be looked upon as sources of ideas, not as texts to be learned by heart.

Even professional players read joseki books, at the apprentice stage of their development. Watching these student professionals, we can see them using and misusing joseki that they have picked up from their reading, but do not yet really understand. This gives their games an awkward appearance.

A full-fledged professional, having read dozens of go books and played and watched thousands of games, no longer studies joseki much, but relies on his accumulated experience. He plays joseki not from memory, but from his general feeling for what moves are good in any given situation. He may not know, when he plays a stone, exactly what makes it a good move, or what is going to follow it, but he is confident that the subsequent moves will bear out his judgment.

He adapts his joseki to the surrounding positions, and therefore regularly produces moves not found in, or even criticized in, joseki books. He may pull new surprise moves on his opponents, and they are more likely to be thought up on the spur of the moment than to be the product of secret study the night before.

Amateurs must learn joseki in the same way, starting with sequences they remember from books or from stronger players games, testing them out in their own games, varying them, coming to understand them, and finally being able to play on their own with confidence. This book has been designed to encourage that development: We expect the reader to use his head a little, applying what appears in one place to positions arising in other places without having to be told, and not taking what he reads to be blanket statements covering all situations.

Concerning the authorship of this book, most of the diagrams and ideas in it were supplied by Kosugi in a series of consultations stretching from April to October, The text was written by Davies, who also contributed what diagrams he could.

We are indebted to the Japanese Go Association for the use of their facilities, and to Richard Bozulich of the Ishi Press for offering suggestions on parts of the manuscript.

His parents and all six of his brothers and sisters know how to play go, and three of themhis father, mother, and younger brother are professional go players. Under his fathers tutelage, he became a professional shodan in , reached 2-dan the next year, and 3-dan the year after that. In he took second place in the second division of the Oteai tournament, which determines a professional players rank, and was promoted to 5-dan.

He is known to foreign go visitors to Japan for his good command of English and his lively sense of humor. At present he lives in Ota-ku, Tokyo, with his wife and two daughters. Besides go, he likes to read and play mah-jong. He graduated from Oberlin College in and entered graduate school at the University of Washington, only to have a mathematics professor interest him in the game of go. In he came to Japan, where his go playing has advanced to the amateur 5-dan level. Besides writing for the Ishi Press, he is a regular contributor to Go Review magazine.

He now lives with his wife in the suburbs of Tokyo. This used to be considered a poor play, but that belief has been dispelled in the present century, when professional players have come to make frequent use of three-three point joseki. The virtue of the stone in Dia. If Black attacks, he will have to build his position in the center or along one side of the board, where it is harder to find security.

The drawback of a play on the three-three point is that, tucked so far back in the corner, it does not give much help in developing into the center. The two sections of this chapter will show what happens when Black approaches the white stone in Dia. If Black does not get around to playing against Whites stone, then sooner or later White will want to make a shimari, by adding a stone at 1 or a in Dia.

Such a move, reinforcing the corner, reaching out into the center, and preparing for wide extensions on both sides, is of great value. Black 1 is our first example of a kakari, a move which approaches an isolated enemy corner stone from the outside. It is worth quite a lot for White to push back against this particular kakari with 2, and Black 3 to 5 are the standard continuation. White makes a modest amount of corner territory, while Black gets a center-facing position.

This is the basic joseki pattern, but it is often altered to fit surrounding circumstances. In particular, Black 3, White 4, and Black 5 are often played differently.

We shall examine the meaning of the moves in the basic joseki, and then look at some of the variations. The basic joseki Dia. White 2 in the basic joseki is a big move, for if White leaves it out and Black gets a chance to play 3, then although White can still live in the corner, he will be confined much more tightly than before; see section White 4 is important for the same reason.

If Black omits 3 and White gets to play 4, then Black 1 becomes almost useless. This formation is better for White than just a shimari would be. Therefore Black 3 in the basic joseki is another important move. Black 5 in the basic joseki is easier to leave out than the three moves which preceded it, but it does prevent White 1 in this diagram, a move which prepares both to attack the black stones and to make territory on the left side.

After the joseki, Black 1 here is a big move, preparing to make territory and eye shape on the lower side, and stopping White from enlarging his corner in that direction. Sometimes it is best to play 1 instead of.

To prevent Black 1 in the last diagram, White often continues the basic joseki by playing 6, although that gives Black sente. White 4: Here is one variation in the basic joseki. Black 7 prepares to wall off the left side at a, so White usually plays 8 at b, leaving Black to take c or some other point. Black 1 is especially appropriate when White has made two extensions like from his corner stone.

After 5, White can attack the stones Black has played, but unless by some chance he succeeds in actually capturing them, he cannot get a lot of territory here.

Compare his prospects in this diagram with what they would be if he could make a shimari at 3. Incidentally, this is a situation where Black might play 5 at a for a faster get-away into the center. Either way is joseki, but Instead of following the basic joseki pattern, in this situation White might well play 4 and so on to take territory on the left side.

Black can finish the sequence with 13, giving himself some room for eyes and getting ready to attack White. Black makes a one-point jump Dia. By way of introducing some of the other variations in this joseki, lets examine this sequence, taken from a professional game. White attacked Black with 1, and Black 2 and 4 made a nice reply. Against White 5, Black jumped out to 6, and White wedged in at 7. If Black had played 6 here White would have skipped out to 7, and it would have been hard for Black to do much of anything with 6 and.

He could not very well attack the white stones in the middle of the lower side, because they could connect to the left hand corner at a. In one variation of this joseki, White plays 7 as shown to take territory on the lower side, but in the present game that would let Black get a big point at 8 on the right side.

Later Black could play a or b in sente, even if White first played c, and there would remain ways, such as Black d, for him to break into the lower side. But it would not have been good for Black to play 8 after White 7 here, because then White 9 would have taken a large lower side and left Black very weak. So the actual game continued this way. Next Black was able to live on the lower side by playing a and b.

White could have secured the lower side territory by playing 11 herethe connection between it and could not be brokenbut then Black would have played 12 and White would have been faced with the need to make an invasion on the right side.

White 13 looks like the best point, since White does not want to be pushed toward Blacks strong wall in the lower right, but however he invades, he cannot get the worry-free position he had in Dia. In conclusion These sequences can be used not only in the corner, but whenever a stone anywhere on the third line is attacked with a shoulder-hitting move like Black 1. Since such shoulder-blows are one of the common ways of reducing large potential territories, the patterns of this section turn up frequently in the opening and early middle game.

It often happens that Black wants to approach Whites stone from one side or the other, instead of attacking at a. The exchange of Black 1 for White 2 forms a simple joseki. Depending on the situation, White may answer Black 1 at a, b.

Also, instead of Black 1, there are other similar kakari which we shall look at. As a rule, Black should make a kakari like 1 when his purpose is to do something constructive on the left side. When his aim is to destroy white territory, however, the shoulder-hitting kakari of section 1 is better. Ogeima kakari Dia. In this common position Black 1 is often played. It and Black 3 give Black a position on the left side, weakening White.

If Black played this joseki, then he would be putting much less pressure on White ; this time, after White 6, Black a would pose very little threat to White. When White has made an extension like from his corner stone, Black 1 may be used to reduce the size of his prospective territory.

Compare its size now with what it would be if White made a shimari at 1. Here White should definitely play 2 on the fourth line, for this builds toward a larger territory than White a would.

Next, b is a good point for either player. The reason White does not always play 2 on the fourth line is that Black can then attack from the other side with 3. This aims at a, from which point Black can connect to either 1 or 3.

In this case White might answer 1 at 2 instead of a. The argument for doing so is that even if White extended to a, Black would still be able to invade the lower side, at b for instance. Since White needs two stones to defend the side anyway, 2 and, later, White b make a well-balanced formation, and 2 makes the corner stronger than White a would. Other kakari Dia. When Black approaches White from the side, he need not always use the ogeima kakari.

The kogeima kakari is possible too, although it must be used with discretion, since it provokes this sequence, in which White makes a lot of secure territory on the lower side.

In this situation Black 2 would be the correct kakari. White could play a or b instead of 3. If we move White 1 and Black a line higher, then Black 2 should be moved accordingly.

Tenuki Dia. When White fails to respond to 1, the keima at Black 3 is the standard play. White can slide out to a or b, but he is being pressed into a very low position. Later on Dia. After the basic joseki, Black can play kikashi at 1 and 3, useful points because they interfere with Whites extending to a. However, these moves make White solid and strong, and Black should not play them too early, since there are other things he may want to try against the corner.

Dia This shows one of those other possibilities. Black 1 and 3 aim at exchanging the corner territory for the outside, and might be used if Black became hard to defend. If White played 4 at 7, Black could play 5 at 4 or a, and in one way or another it should be possible for him to make eye shape. In conclusion Generally speaking, Blacks plays in this section are much more loose and open than his ones in the previous section.

For that reason they allow White to build toward larger territories than before, but at the same time they leave more possibilities for Black in the corner itself. A stone placed here, like one on the point, protects the corner territory, but it is not as likely to be shut in from the outside.

If White attacks with 1 in Dia. Rather than have Black solidify such a large corner, White usually attacks with one of the plays shown in Dias. If we think of the black stone as a stone on the third line, then White 1 in Dia. Whites general aim is to establish a position on the right side or in the center, while Black takes the corner territory.

All of the joseki in this chapter illustrate that idea, and most of them start with White 1 in Dia. If we think of the black stone as a stone on the fourth line, then White 1 in Dia. Most of the joseki starting this way have Black answering with a squeeze play on the right side, and are to be found in chapter 3.

In this chapter, section 7 , will be found Blacks reply at b. The ogeima kakari in Dia. Section 8 of this chapter and section 18 of the next are devoted to this play. The kakari in Dia. It is sometimes used by those who like a quick opening development, their idea being to ignore whatever reply Black makes, a and b are typical replies , and rush on to some other part of the board. We shall forego any further discussion of this kakari. One of the advantages of playing on the point is that a stone there is in an excellent position for making a shimari.

The one in Dia. Black 1 in Dia. The shimari plays in Dias. After any of these four shimari, an extension on the lower side becomes a large move for either player. There are special joseki starting from these four shimari, but they are not part of this book. In this chapter we shall see what happens when White attacks the single stone on the three-four point and Black answers by defending his corner. There is another large group of three-four point joseki in which Black answers Whites kakari by counterattacking with a squeeze play, but that is the subject of the next chapter.

White 1 tries more for a position on the outside than for corner profit, and in fact Black can get all the corner territory by playing 2. White plays 3 if he is interested in the right side; in the next section we shall see an alternative choice for 3 which builds more toward the center and lower side.

Black 2 is a tsuke and Black 4 is a hiki, so this joseki is usually called the tsuke-hiki joseki. White 5, Black 6, and White 7 are one way to finish it, the spacing of 5 and 7 being Rood, but of course there are variations.

38 Basic Joseki

Some variations Dia. The basic joseki ends in Whites gote. If White wants sente he can play tenuki after Blacks hiki, for if Black cuts at 1 in this diagram White can still make a position for himself with 2 and 4.

Black, however, has much greater prospects on the lower side and in the center than before. Black can make a solid connection with 5 and then extend to 7, or a , as shown here, keeping the three-line interval between 7 and 5.

In this situation, the spacing between 7 and is also just right. The point b may become another good extension for Black later on. Sometimes White plays 6 as shown here, so as to be able to play a later. White 6 gets in the way of Black b. By and by Black may annoy White by playing c himself, aiming at d in the corner. After the kaketsugi at 5 White need not always extend at a. In this situation he might choose to make a shimari at 7 instead.

Thinking of this, Black can play 6 and 8, or 6 and a, or 6 and b , instead of just a. Then after White 9 he can attack with 10, and Black 6 should turn out to be useful in the fighting to come.

He must play 6 right after White 5 if he wants White to answer it at 7. It is futile for Black to play 1 after Dia.

White will reply at 2, building a wall which works beautifully with his shimari. Of course Black is getting territory too, but not as much as White. Black turns out to be almost completely wasted. White could even apply this sequence in answer to Black 6 in Dia. Sometimes White is unable to extend up the right side, and then he must change his tactics accordingly. In this situation, for example, White should jump out into the center with 5 instead of playing a, making a quick escape.

Black takes the vital point at 6. If White were allowed to play there he would make good shape for his stones while destroying a lot of Blacks lower side territory. White 7 establishes room for two eyes on the right side.

When he jumps out to 5, White need not fear this Black 6. Even if he is unable to capture the cutting stone in shicho, White 9 at 10 , he can make shape as shown, and Black begins to look very weak, while the lower side is still open. The loss of costs White very little, and if Black cuts at a and captures another stone, again it is not so important. A common opening pattern on the right side Dia.

Here is one common opening pattern in which the joseki we have just been studying is often played. Black 13 is a big point, although Black a would be big, too. The reason that Black 13 is so big is that it prepares for an invasion at b. Of course White can defend with c, but then Black will play a, happy with the exchange of 13 for c, so maybe White should play 14 at a. That 1.

It is not so from above with underneath at 5, White. White 2 here is the correct answer to Black 1. Now White is ready to play either a or b to connect his position.

If Black plays 3 at c White will play a, and if Black plays 3 at d White will play b. At the same time, White e has become a strong move for later on. If Black is determined to make trouble he can play tsuke at 3, leading to a ko. White can play 8 at a or b. Black had better be sure of his ko threats before starting this fight.

If White lacks ko threats he cannot play 4 and 6 in the last diagram, but must submit to being cut in two as shown here.

He can still fight in his separated shape, but it will be hard for him. Thus White 1 is quite large, for after it the invasion at a is not likely to pose any threat at all. In conclusion This is a simple and satisfying joseki for Black, since he gets a strong corner while Whites shape is still open to attack.

But on the other hand, White comes out of it with a higher position, and it is easier for him to develop a really large territory than it is for Black, so there is nothing unfair about it. There are many opening situations where it is a reasonable choice for both Players.

This joseki starts out like the one in the last section, but now White slides along the top with 3 instead of playing hane at d.

No variation is possible in Black 4 and White 5. This joseki is known as the nadare, which means avalanche in Japanese. It does not stop here, for Black has a serious weakness in the cutting point at a, while White is vulnerable to a hane at b.

Black has four choices for his next play; a, b, c, and d. We shall concentrate on Black a and b. Black 6: Black defends his weak point at 6, and White does likewise at 7. After Black 8, White has good plays at a and b, and he can also play tenuki. With this shimari in the lower left corner it is a good idea for White to make the kaketsugi at 9, working toward a large territory across the lower side. With the joseki turned on its side, this is the same situation as before, except that White has only a single stone in the other corner.

White 9 is not a bad move, but now Black can easily make a position on the side with 10 and So White may prefer to make a play like 9 here. Black can attack with 10, but the fight is a fair one, both the black and the white groups being weak.

White must be careful not to play 9 too close to the lower right corner. If he plays it here, Black will just push out with 10 and Now it is obvious that there is too little territory below White 9 and too much open space above it. The other key point for White is at 9. This play enlarges Whites wall and, by preventing Black a, reduces Blacks prospects on the right side.

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If Black answers White 9, he should do so at If Black plays 10 here he leaves a serious weak point at a which White can exploit if he has a stone further up on the right side. Do you see the relation of a to White b? If Black fails to answer , White can play kikashi at 1. Blacks best response is 2, but this exchange by itself hinders Black in the expansion of his territory along the right side.

The small nadare joseki Dia. Black attacks with 6 and White counter attacks with 7, forming the so-called small nadare joseki.

White 9, threatening both a and b, is the key to this variation. Black 10 threatens to capture all the white stones, and White 11 defends. Black 12 is a good tesuji and Black 16 takes the corner, but the cutting point at a remains. White cuts and makes a position for himself on the right side, and after this the joseki continues with a fight involving the weak black stones in the center.

One idea for Blacks next move is a. After White 11, this is another possible variation. What happens if White plays nobi with 11? The feasibility of this move depends on a shicho. Black can crawl out at 12, and when White cuts at 13 Black attacks with 14, 16, and If the shicho works, White loses everything.

If White plays 13 at 16, then Black 13 captures the corner stones, and this is not so good for White either. So if the shicho favors Black, White 11 is impossible, but on the other hand if the shicho favors White, this diagram is not very good for Black. When the shicho is against Black, he must play as shown here, taking the corner.

Next White should take the vital point at a, and of course b is his sente on the right side. Black 6 here forms the so-called o-nadare, big nadare , joseki. This move is not as aggressive as the hane at a, so White will often answer it by playing tenuki.

If White does continue with the joseki, then this diagram shows the simplest way. Another idea is to exchange 7 for 8 and then tenuki, without playing 9. Finally there is this double hane variation, which leaves Black with good plays at a and b. Perhaps you can figure out what happens if White does not answer Black a. In conclusion White is offering Black a modest amount of corner and side territory in return for a wall, basically a simple idea, but there are many complicated variations to the nadare joseki, including a whole family arising from the o-nadare which we have not mentioned.

In answer to Blacks kakari at 1, the tsuke on the outside is also possible. The sequence up to Black 5 is the usual joseki, although there is a difficult variation, not to be found in this book, in which Black plays 3 at a. After Black 5, White can continue by playing b or c, or he can leave the shape as it is.

We shall look at all three of these possibilities, as well as a variation in which Black plays 5 at c. Lets start with the two ways of playing White 6.

White 6: The tsuke at 6 secures the corner territory. You may be impressed with Whites large profit in this sequence, but Black has sente, if White fails to play 10 then Black can play there himself and completely.

Whites position is not solid: Black can play a, threatening to continue with b. The idea behind this White 6 is to build a wall over the lower side, and after White 8 Black typically makes some move on the lower side to reduce the amount of white territory there. Before doing so, he may push White a bit farther, Black a, White b. White can still play c later on to take the corner. Instead of 8 in Dia. The sequence may continue this way, although 13 at a, to take sente , and 15 at b are other possibilities.

White has a higher wall than before, but Black is also stronger, and he may be able to put Black 9 to use later. White plays tenuki Dia. If White lets Black have the next play after the basic joseki, then Black will play the tsuke at 1, and White 2 to 8 are the correct response. In this sequence, which is not finished, if Black plays 7 at 8 then White will play 8 at 7, and although the ensuing semeai in the corner may be difficult, if played correctly it ends in Blacks defeat.

Continuing from the last diagram, Black captures two stones in shicho. White is confined to a small corner, but since he gets to play a shicho-breaking move in the upper right corner, he is not so badly off.

If the shicho does not work, Black can still confine White with these plays. Black 5: Here is one situation in which Black should play 5 instead of c, for if he plays c and gets into Dia.

This variation of the joseki continues with White cutting at 6 and taking the corner. Black has sente and can build territory on the right side, and from he can easily invade the lower side. White 10 is a tesuji in this shape, and Black 11 an important kikashi, making a Whites gote. You may wonder why White doesnt play 10 here. After all, doesnt that allow him to take sente? Yes, but then Black can play 1 and 3 here sente , which do terrible damage to the corner. In conclusion This simple joseki, which is a favorite with the famous professional player Sakata, can occur not only as shown in the corner, but anywhere along the side of the board, so its basic moves are well worth learning.

The keima at Black 2 is a less forcible response to White 1 than the tsuke moves we have studied previously, but it is no less a good move. Sometimes White plays tenuki after it, but then a second attacking move at a, or thereabouts, makes it difficult for him to form eye space on the lower side gracefully.

Therefore White usually continues with 3 and 5, after which this joseki has three variations. Black can play b. This Black 6 is suitable for building territory on the right side, since it leaves Black with no weak points. If White fails to extend to, or in the direction of, 7, then again Black can attack at a.

Black 8 and 10 are consistent with Black 6, and are typical follow-up moves to this joseki. Later on, Black can play kikashi with 1, flattening out Whites territory on the lower side while expanding his own area.

This Black 6 is more suitable for attack and is especially good when Black already has stones on the sides, as in this diagram. The idea is to keep White weak by interfering with his eye space along the lower edge. In this particular situation White might extend on the fourth line to 7, so as to make a quick march into the center at a next.

The drawback of Black 6 is that it leaves the possibility of White b, which threatens White c, but with his weak group on the lower side to look after. White may never get a chance to exploit this weakness. The original keima, Black , is thought to be a good way to start the attack, in line with the general principle of not playing in contact with the stones to be attacked.

The tsuke at Black 2 is much less effective, for White can make excellent shape by following the sequence up to In comparison with the last diagram Black has made more corner profit, but White is already out into the center, Black is looking very weak, and the right side is still open to White a. Here is one case in which, after White 5, Black should play neither a nor 7, but should play 6 to help his stone. White now plays 7 in the corner, to keep Black from taking that point and also preparing to play b and capture two stones, but Black can defend his position with 8.

This is much better for him than White 5, Black a, White c. There are other ideas in this situation: White might be inclined to play 3 at c to attack at once, or for that matter Black might play 2 at 6, to forestall such action. Maybe we are pointing out the obvious, but it would be a mistake for White to try to counter- attack with 7 in this diagram, for then Black would defend his shape with 8, leaving both White 7 and the three stones in the corner weak.

In conclusion The keima response to Whites kakari looks like a quiet move, but there is nothing peaceful about Blacks intentions in playing it. Aggressive action often starts slowly like this; when you appreciate that fact you will have learned something about go. When White makes a kogeima kakari with 1, the diagonal play at Black 2 is the simplest reply.

It has three purposes: White usually answers it, if at all, by extending up the right side to a, b. When the diagonal play is needed Dia. Here is an example of one kind of position in which the diagonal play is particularly necessary. White has a solid fortress in the upper right corner, and Black 1 is urgently needed to keep the white territory on the right side from growing too large.

In this sequence White makes his most ambitious defense, but Black has brought the situation under control. In this case White 2 at a would be far too timid. White b would be better, but with the strength he has in the upper right, White should try for the greatest possible territory by playing 2 as shown. Dia 2. If Black fails to make the diagonal play, then White will land on the vital point at 1, and his territory takes on gigantic proportions.

Now lets see what Black can do if White doesnt answer his diagonal play. There are two ways for him to attack. If White plays tenuki after in this position, Black will press him with 1.

Elementary Go Series - 38 Basic Joseki Vol. 2

Whites strength in the upper right goes completely to waste, and Black has a wall to use for building territory over the lower side. This is not at all good for White.

Lets take a closer look at Black 1 and White 2. Black has many ways to proceed from this exchange. We have just shown a; b and c are similar, and d and e are other possibilities. Black may also play tenuki. The exchange of 1 for 2 by itself is usually good for him. If White makes the next play after 2, he should play a.

Here Black 1 and 3 are appropriate. Because of the nearness of Black there is no sense in playing 1 at 2 to build a wall. If Black pushes through and cuts, White will usually capture the cutting stone, making good shape on the outside.

Black has the corner, but he also has gote. This is not bad for Whitenote the endgame point left for him at a. It is possible for White to resist Black 3 with White 4, but is not really so smart of him to do so. Even though he can fight a little bit on the outside with , he will soon have to play a to live in the corner.

Sometimes Black may want to attack from the side instead of playing as in Dia. Here is one likely setting for such a move. Against this Black 1, White could run out at 3 if he had any chance of counterattacking, but Black might get to play a and White could find himself fighting a running battle without any base on the side.

It may be better for him to look for eye space than just to run away into the center, and if so, he should play 2. Black can confine him with 3, but he lives comfortably with 4 and 6. Another example Dia. Whereas in Dia. If White defends on the right side at 2, then Black can extend toward the shimari with 3.

If White plays 2 on the lower side, then Black can attack on the right side at a. Whites four-line extension to may look unsafe, but if Black invades at 1, White has 2 and 4 to play, which give Black the cut at a to worry about. The first chapter deals with pre- calculation and the evaluation of tactical situations. The following fourteen chapters introduce different categories of Tesuji, worked out practically with the help of problems.

In the last chapter the learned is tested with several difficult problems. Each chapter deals with specified shape, that is on the border of life and death, and clarifies when a shape is alive and when it is death.

In each chapter the learned is deepened with the help of problems. The single chapters deal with territory and power, attacking strategy, attacking moves, defense, forcing- and inducing move, the reduction and invasion as well as the Ko-fight.The sequence begun in the last diagram ends in this way, or in something similar. They occur in especially large numbers in the corners, where the initial fighting of the game generally takes place.

In this case White 2 at a would be far too timid. But when Black plays keima with 3, White may prefer to play 4 this way, trying to avoid a running battle. Black plays 8 from above Dia. The fighting might continue this way.