resourceone.info Politics Victory Over The Darkness Pdf

VICTORY OVER THE DARKNESS PDF

Monday, August 26, 2019


Reading Victory Over the Darkness has been the catalyst for numerous people on the journey of spiritual freedom in Christ. As part of our core curriculum studies . Editorial Reviews. Review. Countless people have found genuine freedom in Christ through the insights God has given Neil Anderson. Among them is my oldest. FREE~DOWNLOAD Victory Over the Darkness Realize The Power Of Your Identity In Christ EBOOK EPUB KIND. (Epub Download) Victory Over the Darkness Realize The Power Of Your Identity In Christ Ebook READ O. Loud And Quiet 73 – Tobias Jesso Jr.


Victory Over The Darkness Pdf

Author:EVIE LUEBANO
Language:English, Spanish, French
Country:Kuwait
Genre:Personal Growth
Pages:291
Published (Last):18.02.2016
ISBN:556-7-17930-220-8
ePub File Size:23.67 MB
PDF File Size:18.28 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:45683
Uploaded by: LAURINE

Victory over the darkness by Neil T. Anderson; 3 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Discipling (Christianity), Pastoral counseling. Through his influential ministry, Freedom in Christ, Neil T. Anderson brings his so -called . including his foundational works, Victory over the Darkness and The. VICTORY OVER THE DARKNESS. by Neil T. Anderson - Synopsis by Merrilee Clark. Introduction: Lend Me Your Hope Pg 2. Chapter 1: Who Are You? Pg 2.

Renewing Your Mind--Become Victory Series Book 4 Neil T. Christ-Centered Therapy Neil T. Anderson Author Terry E. Zuehlke Author Breaking the Bondage of Legalism Neil T. Growing in Christ--Deepen Victory Series Book 5 Neil T. One Day at a Time Neil T. Anderson Author Mike Quarles Author The Beginner's Guide to Liberating Prayer Neil T.

Experiencing Christ Together Neil T. Anderson Author Charles Mylander Author Winning the Battle Within Neil T.

Anderson Author Charles Mylander Author of introduction, etc. Your Authority in Victory Series Book 7 Neil T.

Victory Over The Darkness

Sold Out for God Neil T. Indeed, even now you are not yet able , for you are still fleshly. For since there is jealousy and strife among you, are you not fleshly, and are you not walking like mere men? We live in a country glutted with biblical material, Christian books, radio and television, but many Christians are not moving on to spiritual maturity.

Some are no more loving now than they were 20 years ago. We read in 1 Timothy, The goal of our instruction is love from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith 1: Since that time the focus of my ministry, both as a pastor and a seminary professor, has been the interrelated ministries of discipling and Christian counseling.

I have been a discipler and a counselor of countless people. I have also taught discipleship and pastoral counseling at the seminary level and in churches and leadership conferences across the country and around the world.

I have found one common denominator for all struggling Christians. They do not know who they are in Christ, nor do they understand what it means to be a child of God. Why not? Slowly I began to understand how to help people resolve their personal and spiritual conflicts through genuine repentance by submitting to God and resisting the devil see Jas.

My seminary education had taught me about the kingdom of God but not about the kingdom of darkness and that our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places Eph.

Through countless hours of intense counseling with defeated Christians, I began to understand the battle for their minds and how they could be transformed by renewing their minds. I am saddened by how we have separated the ministries of discipleship and counseling in our churches. Christian discipleship too often has become an impersonal program, although good theological material is being used.

Christian counseling has been intensely personal but often lacks good theology. I believe discipleship and counseling are biblically the same. If you were a good discipler you would be a good counselor and vice versa. In the course of learning this, my family and I went through a very broken experience. We lost everything we had. God gave me something very dear to me that I could not fix.

No matter what I did, nothing changed. God brought me to the end of my resources, so I could discover His. That was the birth of Freedom in Christ Ministries. He is the Wonderful Counselor. Brokenness is the key to effective ministry and the final ingredient for discipleship counseling. Message and method had come together. Furthermore, it is my conviction that discipleship counseling must start where the Bible starts: We must have a true knowledge of God and know who we are as children of God.

If we really knew God, our behavior would change radically and instantly.

Whenever heaven opened to reveal the glory of God, individual witnesses in the Bible were immediately and profoundly changed. I believe that the greatest determinant of mental and spiritual health and spiritual freedom is a true understanding of God and a right relationship with Him.

A good theology is an indispensable prerequisite to a good psychology. Several weeks after one of my conferences, a friend shared with me the story of a dear Christian woman who had attended. She had lived in a deep depression for several years. She survived by leaning on her friends, three counseling sessions a week and a variety of prescription drugs.

During the conference this woman realized that her support system included everybody and everything but God.

She had not cast her anxiety on Christ and she was anything but dependent on Him. She took her conference syllabus home and began focusing on her identity in Christ and expressing confidence in Him to meet her daily needs. She threw off all her other supports a practice I do not recommend and decided to trust in Christ alone to relieve her depression. She began living by faith and renewing her mind as the conference notes suggested.

After one month she was a different person. Knowing God is indispensable to maturity and freedom. Another point at which discipling and counseling intersect is in the area of individual responsibility. People who want to move forward in Christian maturity can certainly benefit from the counsel of others, and those who seek freedom from their past can also be helped by others.

Ultimately, however, every Christian is responsible for his or her own maturity and freedom in Christ. Nobody can make you grow. Nobody can solve your problems for you. You alone must initiate and follow through with that process. Thankfully, however, none of us walks through the disciplines of personal maturity and freedom alone.

The indwelling Christ is eagerly willing to walk with us each step of the way. This book is the first of two books I have written from my education and experience in discipling and counseling others. This book focuses on the foundational issues of living and maturing in Christ. You will discover who you are in Christ and how to live by faith. You will learn how to walk by the Spirit and be sensitive to His leading.

The grace walk is living by faith in the power of the Holy Spirit. In this book you will discover the nature of the battle for your mind and learn why your mind must be transformed so you can live by faith and grow spiritually.

You will gain insight into how to manage your emotions and be set free from the emotional traumas of your past through faith and forgiveness. Being alive and free in Christ is an essential prerequisite for maturity in Christ. We cannot achieve instant maturity. The world, the flesh and the devil are enemies of our sanctification, but they have been and can be overcome in Christ. I suggest that you complete this book first, learn about living and growing in Christ, then work through the subjects of spiritual conflicts and freedom by reading The Bondage Breaker.

The first half of the book lays a doctrinal foundation and defines terms that are necessary for understanding and implementing the more practical chapters that follow.

You may be tempted to skip over the first half because it seems less relevant to daily experience. It is critical, however, to discern your position and victory in Christ so you can implement the practices of growth in Him. You need to know what to believe before you can understand what to do. Now, however, I am convinced that my attempts at discipling Russ failed for another reason. The apostle Paul wrote, "I gave you milk to drink, not solid food; for you were not yet able to receive it.

Indeed, even now you are not yet able, for you are still fleshly. For since there is jealousy and strife among you, are you not fleshly, and are you not walking like mere men? Apparently, because of unresolved conflicts in their lives, carnal Christians are not able to receive the solid food of God's Word. That's when I began to discern that discipling people to Christian maturity involves much more than leading them through a step-by-step, week Bible study.

We live in a country glutted with biblical material, Christian books, radio and television, but many Christians are not moving on to spiritual maturity. Some are no more loving now than they were 20 years ago. We read in 1 Timothy, "The goal of our instruction is love from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith" Since that time the focus of my ministry, both as a pastor and a seminary professor, has been the interrelated ministries of discipling and Christian counseling.

I have been a discipler and a counselor of countless people. I have also taught discipleship and pastoral counseling at the seminary level and in churches and leadership conferences across the country and around the world. I have found one common denominator for all struggling Christians. They do not know who they are in Christ, nor do they understand what it means to be a child of God.

Why not? As a pastor, I believed that Christ was the answer and truth would set people free, but I really didn't know how. People at my church had problems for which I didn't have answers, but God did.

Slowly I began to understand how to help people resolve their personal and spiritual conflicts through genuine repentance by submitting to God and resisting the devil see Jas. My seminary education had taught me about the kingdom of God, but not about the kingdom of darkness and that "our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against rulers, against the powers, against the world forces of this darkness, against the spiritual forces of wickedness in the heavenly places" Eph.

Through countless hours of intense counseling with defeated Christians, I began to understand the battle for their minds and how they could be transformed by renewing their minds.

See a Problem?

I am saddened by how we have separated the ministries of discipleship and counseling in our churches. Christian discipleship too often has become an impersonal program, although good theological material is being used. Christian counseling has been intensely personal, but often lacks good theology. I believe discipleship and counseling are biblically the same. If you were a good discipler you would be a good counselor and vice versa. Discipleship counseling is the process where two or more people meet together in the presence of Christ, learn how the truth of God's Word can set them free and thus are able to conform to the image of God as they walk by faith in the power of the Holy Spirit.

In the course of learning this, my family and I went through a very broken experience. For 15 months I didn't know whether my wife, Joanne, was going to live or die. We lost everything we had. God gave me something very dear to me that I could not fix. No matter what I did, nothing changed. God brought me to the end of my resources, so I could discover His.

Neil T. Anderson

That was the birth of Freedom in Christ Ministries. Nobody reading this book knows any better than I do that I can't set anybody free; only God can do that. I can't bind up anybody's broken heart; only God can do that. He is the Wonderful Counselor. Brokenness is the key to effective ministry and the final ingredient for discipleship counseling.

Message and method had come together. Furthermore, it is my conviction that discipleship counseling must start where the Bible starts: We must have a true knowledge of God and know who we are as children of God.

If we really knew God, our behavior would change radically and instantly. Whenever heaven opened to reveal the glory of God, individual witnesses in the Bible were immediately and profoundly changed. I believe that the greatest determinant of mental and spiritual health and spiritual freedom is a true understanding of God and a right relationship with Him.

A good theology is an indispensable prerequisite to a good psychology. Several weeks after one of my conferences, a friend shared with me the story of a dear Christian woman who had attended. She had lived in a deep depression for several years. She survived by leaning on her friends, three counseling sessions a week and a variety of prescription drugs. During the conference this woman realized that her support system included everybody and everything but God.

She had not cast her anxiety on Christ and she was anything but dependent on Him. She took her conference syllabus home and began focusing on her identity in Christ and expressing confidence in Him to meet her daily needs. She threw off all her other supports a practice I do not recommend and decided to trust in Christ alone to relieve her depression.

She began living by faith and renewing her mind as the conference notes suggested. After one month she was a different person. Knowing God is indispensable to maturity and freedom. Another point at which discipling and counseling intersect is in the area of individual responsibility. People who want to move forward in Christian maturity can certainly benefit from the counsel of others, and those who seek freedom from their past can also be helped by others.

Ultimately, however, every Christian is responsible for his or her own maturity and freedom in Christ. Nobody can make you grow. That's your decision and daily responsibility. Nobody can solve your problems for you. You alone must initiate and follow through with that process.

Thankfully, however, none of us walks through the disciplines of personal maturity and freedom alone. The indwelling Christ is eagerly willing to walk with us each step of the way. This book is the first of two books I have written from my education and experience in discipling and counseling others. This book focuses on the foundational issues of living and maturing in Christ.

You will discover who you are in Christ and how to live by faith. You will learn how to walk by the Spirit and be sensitive to His leading. The grace walk is living by faith in the power of the Holy Spirit.

In this book you will discover the nature of the battle for your mind and learn why your mind must be transformed so you can live by faith and grow spiritually. You will gain insight into how to manage your emotions and be set free from the emotional traumas of your past through faith and forgiveness. Being alive and free in Christ is an essential prerequisite for maturity in Christ.

We cannot achieve instant maturity. It will take us the rest of our lives to renew our minds and conform to the image of God, but it doesn't take as long to realize our identity and freedom in Christ.

The world, the flesh and the devil are enemies of our sanctification, but they have been and can be overcome in Christ. I suggest that you complete this book first, learn about living and growing in Christ, then work through the subjects of spiritual conflicts and freedom by reading The Bondage Breaker.

Victory over the Darkness is arranged something like a New Testament Epistle. The first half of the book lays a doctrinal foundation and defines terms that are necessary for understanding and implementing the more practical chapters that follow.

You may be tempted to skip over the first half because it seems less relevant to daily experience. It is critical, however, to discern your position and victory in Christ so you can implement the practices of growth in Him. You need to know what to believe before you can understand what to do. I have talked to thousands of people like Russ, my first discipleship candidate.

They are Christians, but they are not growing and they are not bearing fruit. They want to serve Christ, but they can't seem to get over the top and get on with their lives in a meaningful and productive way. They need to have their hope reestablished in Christ, as the following poem describes: Lend me your hope for awhile, I seem to have mislaid mine. Lost and hopeless feelings accompany me daily, pain and confusion are my companions.

I know not where to turn; looking ahead to future times does not bring forth images of renewed hope. I see troubled times, pain-filled days, and more tragedy. Lend me your hope for awhile, I seem to have mislaid mine. Hold my hand and hug me; listen to all my ramblings, recovery seems so far distant.

The road to healing seems like a long and lonely one. Stand by me, offer me your presence, your heart and your love. Acknowledge my pain, it is so real and ever present. I am overwhelmed with sad and conflicting thoughts. Lend me your hope for awhile; a time will come when I will heal, and I will share my renewal, hope and love with others. Do these words reflect your experience and echo your plea as a believer?

Do you sometimes feel hemmed in by the world, the flesh and the devil to the point that you wonder if your Christianity is worth anything? Do you sometimes fear you will never be all God called you to be? Do you long to get on with your Christian maturity and experience the freedom God's Word promises?

I want to share my hope with you in the pages ahead. Your maturity is the product of time, pressure, trials, tribulations, the knowledge of God's Word, an understanding of who you are in Christ and the presence of the Holy Spirit in your life. You probably already have the first four elements in abundance; most Christians do. Let me add some generous doses of the last three ingredients. When Christians are alive and free in Christ, watch them grow!

I really enjoy asking people, "Who are you? For example, if someone asked me, "Who are you? Who are you? My physical dimensions and appearance, however, aren't me either. If you chopped off my arms and legs would I still be me? If you transplanted my heart, kidneys or liver would I still be me?

Of course! Now if you keep chopping you will get to me eventually because I am in here somewhere. Who I am, though, is far more than what you see on the outside. The apostle Paul said, "We recognize no man according to the flesh" 2 Cor. Maybe the Early Church didn't, but generally we do. We tend to identify ourselves and each other primarily by what we look like tall, short, stocky, slender or what we do plumber, carpenter, nurse, engineer, clerk.

Furthermore, when we Christians are asked to identify ourselves in relation to our faith, we usually talk about our doctrinal position Protestant, evangelical, Calvinist, charismatic , our denominational preference Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist, Independent or our role in the church Sunday School teacher, choir member, deacon, usher.

Is who you are determined by what you do, or is what you do determined by who you are? That is an important question, especially as it relates to Christian maturity. I subscribe to the latter. I believe that your hope for growth, meaning and fulfillment as a Christian is based on understanding who you are—specifically, your identity in Christ as a child of God.

Your understanding of who God is and who you are in relationship to Him is the critical foundation for your belief system and your behavior patterns as a Christian. I have never met a girl who had so much going for her. She was cover-girl pretty and had a wonderful figure. She was immaculately dressed.

She had completed 12 years of school in 11 years and graduated near the top of her class. As a talented musician, she had received a full-ride music scholarship to a Christian university.

Victory Over the Darkness: Realize the Power of Your Identity in Christ

She also drove a brand-new sports car her parents gave her for graduation. I was amazed that one person could have so much. She talked with me for half an hour and I realized that what I saw on the outside wasn't matching what I was beginning to see on the inside.

I could ask almost anyone that same question at some time in their lives and get the same response. The world would have us believe that if we appear attractive or perform well or enjoy a certain amount of status, then we will have it all together inside as well. That is not always true, however. External appearance, accomplishment and recognition don't necessarily reflect—or produce—internal peace and maturity.

In his book The Sensation of Being Somebody, Maurice Wagner expresses this false belief in simple equations we tend to accept. He says we mistakenly think that good appearance plus the admiration it brings equal a whole person. Or we feel that star performance plus accomplishments equal a whole person. Or we believe that a certain amount of status plus the recognition we accumulate equal a whole person.

Not so. These equations are no more correct than two plus two equal six. Wagner says: Try as we might by our appearance, performance or social status to find self-verification for a sense of being somebody, we always come short of satisfaction. Whatever pinnacle of self-identity we achieve soon crumbles under the pressure of hostile rejection or criticism, introspection or guilt, fear or anxiety. We cannot do anything to qualify for the by-product of being loved unconditionally and voluntarily.

If these equations could work for anyone, they would have worked for King Solomon. He was the king of Israel during the greatest years in its history. He had power, position, wealth, possessions and women. If a meaningful life is the result of appearance, admiration, performance, accomplishments, status or recognition, Solomon would have been the most together man who ever lived.

Not only did he possess all that a fallen humanity could hope for, but God also gave him more wisdom than any other mortal to interpret it all.

What was his conclusion? Utterly meaningless! Everything is meaningless" Eccles. Solomon sought to find purpose and meaning in life independent of God and he wrote a book about it. The book of Ecclesiastes describes the futility of humankind pursuing a meaningful life in a fallen world without God. Millions of people climb those ladders of "success," only to discover when they reach the top that their ladder is leaning against the wrong wall.

We also tend to buy into the negative side of the worldly success-equals-meaning formula by believing that if people have nothing, they have no hope for happiness. For example, I presented this scenario to a high school student a few years ago: "Suppose there's a girl on your campus who has a potato body and stringy hair, who stumbles when she walks and stutters when she talks. She has a bad complexion and she struggles just to get average grades.

Does she have any hope for happiness? Happiness is equated with good looks, relationships with important people, the right job and a fat bank account.

Life devoid of these "benefits" is too often equated with hopelessness. What about life in God's kingdom?

The successequals-happiness and failure-equals-hopelessness equations don't exist. Everyone has exactly the same opportunity for a meaningful life. Because wholeness and meaning in life are not the products of what you have or don't have, what you've done or haven't done. You are already a whole person and possess a life of infinite meaning and purpose because of who you are—a child of God.

Customer Reviews

The only identity equation that works in God's kingdom is you plus Christ equals wholeness and meaning. If our relationship with God is the key to wholeness, why do so many believers struggle with their identity, security, significance, sense of worth and spiritual maturity? Ignorance is probably the primary reason. The prophet Hosea said, "My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge" For others it is carnality, the lack of repentance and faith in God, and some are being deceived by the father of lies.

This deception was brought home to me a few years ago when I was counseling a Christian girl who was the victim of satanic oppression. I asked her, "Who are you? How can a child of God be evil? Is that how you see yourself? Now she may have done some evil things, but at the core of her being she wasn't evil. This was evident by the deep remorse she felt after sinning. She was basing her identity on the wrong equation.

She was letting Satan's accusations influence her perception of herself instead of believing the truth. Sadly, a great number of Christians are trapped in the same downward spiral. We fail, so we see ourselves as failures, which only leads to more failure. We sin, so we see ourselves as sinners, which only leads to more sin. We have been deceived into believing that what we do determines who we are.

That false belief sends us into a tailspin of hopelessness and more defeat. On the other hand, "The Spirit Himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God" Rom.

God wants us to know who we are so we can start living accordingly. Being a child of God who is alive and free in Christ should determine what we do. Then we are working out our salvation see Phil. Genesis reads: "Then the Lord God formed man of dust from the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living being.

Theologians have debated whether the individual members of Adam's race are made up of two or three parts. Those who hold to a trichotomous view believe we are comprised of a body, soul containing mind, emotions and will and spirit. Those who hold to a dichotomous view believe we are comprised of a material and immaterial part, an outer person and an inner person. They would understand the soul and the spirit to be essentially the same.

For the sake of our discussion, we are going to describe who we are from a functional perspective. Suffice it to say, we have an outer self, a physical body that relates to this world through the five senses, and an inner self that relates to God and is created in His image see Gen. Being created in the image of God is what gives us the capacity to fully think, feel and choose.

After God breathed into his nostrils the breath of life, Adam was both physically and spiritually alive. Bios describes the union of your physical body and your immaterial self—mind, emotions and will. To die physically means that you separate from your temporal body. In the Bible, to die means to be separate from, and to be alive means to be in union with.

Paul said to be absent from the body is to be present with the Lord see 2 Cor. Obviously, who you are encompasses more than your physical body, because the body is left behind when you physically die and yet you will be present with the Lord. Significance—Man had a divine purpose Gen. Safety and security—All of man's needs were provided for Gen. Belonging—Man had a sense of belonging Gen.

Your immaterial inner self needs your material outer self to live and function in this world. For example, your physical brain is like the hardware of a computer system and your immaterial mind is like the software.

A computer can't function without software, and software needs a computer to function. You need your physical brain to control your movements and responses, and you need your immaterial mind to reason and make value judgments. The brain can't function independently of how it has been program-med.

The finest organic brain can't accomplish anything in a corpse that lacks a mind.

Your mind can be perfectly programmed, but if your brain is damaged by Alzheimer's disease you cannot function well as a person. As long as I live in the physical world, I must do so in a physical body. As such, I am going to take care of my body as well as I can by exercising, eating right and so on. The truth of the matter is that my body is corruptible and it is decaying. I don't look the way I looked 20 years ago, and I don't have great prospects for the next 20 years.

In 2 Corinthians , Paul referred to the believer's body as a tent, the temporary dwelling place of the soul. Using his illustration, I must confess that my tent pegs are coming up, my poles are sagging and my seams are becoming frayed.

At my age, I am just glad there is more to me than the disposable earth suit in which I walk around. Paul wrote: "Though outwardly we are wasting away, yet inwardly we are being renewed day by day" 2 Cor. He was referring to the spiritual life of the believer that doesn't age or decay as does the outer shell. That is the condition in which Adam was created—physically alive and spiritually alive, in perfect union with God.

For the Christian, to be spiritually alive is to be in union with God. This spiritual life is most often conveyed in the New Testament as being "in Christ," or "in Him. As we shall discover later in this chapter, however, Adam sinned and his union with God was severed. It is God's eternal plan to bring human creation back to Himself and restore the union He enjoyed with Adam at creation. That restored union with God, which we find "in Christ," is what defines who we are as children of God.

Humanity was given dominion over all the other creatures: "Then God said, 'Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; and let them rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over the cattle and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.

Adam didn't have to search for significance. That attribute was the result of creation. Satan had to crawl on his belly like a snake in the presence of God. He was not the god of this world at that time. He usurped the authority given to Adam and his descendants after Adam sinned and lost his relationship with God.

All his needs were provided. Genesis ,30 records: "Then God said, 'Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the surface of all the earth, and every tree which has fruit yielding seed; it shall be food for you; and to every beast of the earth and to every bird of the sky and to every thing that moves on the earth which has life, I have given every green plant for food. All of his needs were provided. He could eat of the tree of life and live forever.

He was safe and secure in the presence of God. Adam and Eve not only had a sense of belonging with God, but also with each other. When God created Eve, He established human community: a meaningful, open, sharing relationship with one another.

Adam and Eve were naked and unashamed. They had nothing to hide. Their bodies consisted of no dirty parts. God created them male and female and told them to be fruitful and multiply. They could openly have an intimate sexual relationship with each other in the presence of God. Genesis 3 tells the sad story of Adam and Eve's lost relationship with God through sin.

The effects of their fall were dramatic, immediate and far reaching, infecting every subsequent member of the human face. They died. Their union with God was severed and they were separated from God. God had specifically said, "You must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat of it you will surely die" Gen. They ate and they died. Did they die physically? Not immediately, although physical death would be a consequence of the Fall as well.

They died spiritually; they were separated from God's presence. They were physically cast out of the Garden of Eden and a cherubim waving a flaming sword was stationed at the entrance "to guard the way to the tree of life" Gen.

Some believe this act preserved a way back as God's plan of redemption unfolded. Just as we inherited physical life from our first parents, so we have inherited spiritual death from them see Rom.God filled that need by creating Eve.

Letting Go of Fear Neil T. Robert Saucy, who has been my mentor, friend and favorite theologian. The road to healing seems like a long and lonely one.

God brought me to the end of my resources, so I could discover His. The grace walk is living by faith in the power of the Holy Spirit. Everyone has exactly the same opportunity for a meaningful life.

On his way home he decided to use the "Who Am I? These equations are no more correct than two plus two equal six. Russ was looking forward to taking some major steps of growth as a Christian, and I was eager to help him develop into a mature believer.