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VALUES AND ETHICS IN PROFESSIONAL PDF

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'Professional ethics and Human values' is a very relevant subject of today's Besides the codes of ethics of Indian professional societies, detailed risk analysis . PDF | This study explores the influence of education, length of service, professionalism, and ethics on the professional values of public relations. PDF | 6+ hours read | Professional Ethics And Hu The Story of a Carpenter An elderly carpenter was ready to retire. He told his.


Values And Ethics In Professional Pdf

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2. Vision statement. 3. Mission statement. 4. Objectives - Human Values & Professional Ethics. 2. PART- I. HUMAN VALUES. 5. Moral. 3. 6. Values. 3. 7. Integrity. To create an awareness on Engineering Ethics and Human Values. The prime objective of the Professional Ethics is to develop ability to deal effectively with. Professional Ethics is a set of standards that describe the professional behavior that is expected in In this tutorial, we will examine the moral and ethical issues.

This allows those professionals who act with a conscience to practice in the knowledge that they will not be undermined commercially by those who have fewer ethical qualms. Internal regulation[ edit ] In cases where professional bodies regulate their own ethics, there are possibilities for such bodies to become self-serving and fail to follow their own ethical code when dealing with renegade members.

This is particularly true of professions in which they have almost a complete monopoly on a particular area of knowledge. For example, until recently, the English courts deferred to the professional consensus on matters relating to their practice that lay outside case law and legislation.

Examples[ edit ] For example, a lay member of the public should not be held responsible for failing to act to save a car crash victim because they could not give an appropriate emergency treatment. Though, they are responsible for attempting to get help for the victim.

This is because they do not have the relevant knowledge and experience. In contrast, a fully trained doctor with the correct equipment would be capable of making the correct diagnosis and carrying out appropriate procedures. Failure of a doctor to not help at all in such a situation would generally be regarded as negligent and unethical.

The importance of our professional values

Most professionals have internally enforced codes of practice that members of the profession must follow to prevent exploitation of the client and to preserve the integrity of the profession.

This is not only for the benefit of the client but also for the benefit of those belonging to that profession.

Disciplinary codes allow the profession to define a standard of conduct and ensure that individual practitioners meet this standard, by disciplining them from the professional body if they do not practice accordingly.

This allows those professionals who act with a conscience to practice in the knowledge that they will not be undermined commercially by those who have fewer ethical qualms. In cases where professional bodies regulate their own ethics, there are possibilities for such bodies to become self-serving and fail to follow their own ethical code when dealing with renegade members.

This is particularly true of professions in which they have almost a complete monopoly on a particular area of knowledge.

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For example, until recently, the English courts deferred to the professional consensus on matters relating to their practice that lay outside case law and legislation. In many countries there is some statutory regulation of professional ethical standards such as the statutory bodies that regulate nursing and midwifery in England and Wales.

For example, a lay member of the public should not be held responsible for failing to act to save a car crash victim because they could not give an appropriate emergency treatment.

Though, they are responsible for attempting to get help for the victim. This is because they do not have the relevant knowledge and experience. In contrast, a fully trained doctor with the correct equipment would be capable of making the correct diagnosis and carrying out appropriate procedures. Failure of a doctor to not help at all in such a situation would generally be regarded as negligent and unethical. Though, if a doctor helps and makes a mistake that is considered negligent and unethical, there could be egregious repercussions.

An untrained person would only be considered to be negligent for failing to act if they did nothing at all to help and is protected by the "Good Samaritan" laws if they unintentionally caused more damage and possible loss of life.

A business may approach a professional engineer to certify the safety of a project which is not safe. While one engineer may refuse to certify the project on moral grounds, the business may find a less scrupulous engineer who will be prepared to certify the project for a bribe , thus saving the business the expense of redesigning. On a theoretical level, there is debate as to whether an ethical code for a profession should be consistent with the requirements of morality governing the public.

Separatists argue that professions should be allowed to go beyond such confines when they judge it necessary. What does "generally considered to be right" mean? That is a critical question, and part of the difficulty in deciding whether or not behavior is ethical is in determining what is right or wrong.

Perhaps the first place to look in determining what is right or wrong is society. Virtually every society makes some determination of morally correct behavior. In Islamic countries, a determination of what is right or moral is tied to religious strictures.

In societies more secular, the influence of religious beliefs may be less obvious, but still a key factor. In the United States much of what is believed to be right or wrong is based in Judeo-Christian heritage. The Ten Commandments, for many people, define what is morally right or wrong. Societies not only regulate the behavior of their members, but also define their societal core values. Experience often has led societies to develop beliefs about what is of value for the common good.

Note that societies differ from one another in the specifics, but not in the general principles. One example is the notion of reciprocity. These "shoulds" define collective effort because they are fundamental to trust and to team relationships that entail risk. The greater the potential risk, the more important ethical practices become.

Organizations, to some extent, define what is right or wrong for the members of the organization. Ethical codes, such as West Point's "A cadet will not lie, cheat, or steal, or tolerate those who do," make clear what the organization considers to be right or wrong. Selfless service puts the welfare of the Nation and the accomplishment of the assigned mission before individual welfare. All who serve the Nation must resist the temptation to pursue self-gain, personal advantage, and self-interest ahead of the collective good.

Furthermore, integrity is demonstrated by propriety in one's personal life. All one needs to do is to look at the positive values of society and the organizations one belongs to, and what is right or wrong should be evident. There is another aspect to be considered, however, and that is the influence of societal or organizational norms. Norms are the unstated rules, usually informally reached by the members of a group, which govern the behavior of the group's members.

Norms often have a greater effect on what is and isn't done by the members of a group than formal rules and regulations. The reason norms are important for a discussion of ethics and values is that norms may allow or even encourage certain behavior as "OK" that is not in keeping with society's or an organization's stated values.

When there is a disconnect between stated and operating values, it may be difficult to determine what is "right. Do those in the organization know that the behavior is wrong, but condone it nevertheless?

Code of Ethics

Is it clear to the Bosnian Serbs that ethnic cleansing is unethical and wrong, or would it fall under the mantle of behavior that is considered to be acceptable in that society? Listen to the arguments in support of ethnic cleansing that have been made, and you will find that many of the perpetrators argued that they did nothing wrong, and were only righting previous wrongs done to them.

York Willbern, in an article entitled "Types and Levels of Public Morality," argues for six types or levels of morality or ethics for public officials. By public officials, he means those who are in policy making positions in public institutions; in other words, strategic decision makers in the government, including the national security arena.

The six levels he differentiates are: basic honesty and conformity to law; conflicts of interest; service orientation and procedural fairness; the ethic of democratic responsibility; the ethic of public policy determination; and the ethic of compromise and social integration.

In many ways, this level only describes the basic adherence to moral codes that is expected of all members of a group or society. There are some basics of behavior that are expected of all if a society is to function for the collective good. For public officials, there is an additional reason why it is important to adhere to these basic moral codes and laws: they have more power than the average member of the society, and hence more opportunity for violation of those codes or laws.

There also is the negative example that misconduct by public officials provides. This relates to public officials, because it deals with the conflict between advancing the public interest, which a public official is charged to do, and advancing one's self-interest.

The duty here is to ensure that the public interest comes first, and that one does not advance his own personal interest at the expense of the public. Willbern uses embezzlement of public funds, bribery, and contract kickbacks as examples of pursuing personal interests at the expense of those of the public.

The requirements for public officials to divest themselves of investments that might be influenced by the performance of their duties or put them in trust and to recuse themselves in situations where they have a personal interest are designed to help public officials avoid conflicts of interest.

Code of Ethics and Standards of Professional Conduct

Ultimately, it still comes down to the individual making an ethical decision. Avoidance of conflict of interest is often difficult because it is often hard to separate personal and public interests, and because individuals as private citizens are encouraged to pursue private interests through any legal means. One of the areas where there is the greatest potential for conflicts of interest is where public officials deal with private organizations which are pursuing their private interests, and where any decision by a public official on allocation of resources will favor some private interest.

The fields of government contracting and acquisition are two areas where the possibility of conflicts of interest is high.They should challenge and seek to address any actions of colleagues who demonstrate negative discrimination or prejudice. Though, they are responsible for attempting to get help for the victim.

Fernandez de Zamora, R. This is particularly true of professions in which they have almost a complete monopoly on a particular area of knowledge. A code of ethics and professional conduct outlines the ethical principles that govern decisions and behavior at a company or organization.

The goal of a code of ethics is to help employees make decisions that are in line with what the company or organization values. Principles of social justice, human rights, collective responsibility and respect for diversities are central to social work.

They should challenge the abuse of power and the exclusion of people from decisions that affect them. No email required.