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THE ORCHID THIEF EBOOK

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Read "The Orchid Thief" by Susan Orlean available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get £3 off your first purchase. Susan Orlean first met John Laroche. Read "The Orchid Thief A True Story of Beauty and Obsession" by Susan Orlean available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first purchase. Editorial Reviews. resourceone.info Review. Orchidelirium is the name the Victorians gave to the Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Science & Math.


The Orchid Thief Ebook

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK A modern classic of personal journalism, The Orchid Thief is Susan Orlean's. About Books Free eBooks The Orchid Thief by Susan Orlean: none Creator: Susan Orlean Best Sellers Rank: #5 Paid in Kindle Store Link. The Orchid Thief is a non-fiction book by American journalist and author Susan Orlean, based on her investigation of the arrest of John Laroche and .

The Orchid Thief

That is how you make your living. As a common parasite, really. People go to great lengths to do this.

They might focus on work or some interest like orchids, or be propelled by a desire to make lots of money or to raise their children in a certain way. And my passion is to examine and interpret that and convey it to other people.

And yes, it is very much a matter of connection and disconnection and belonging and not belonging. You describe Florida as "less like a state than a sponge. What is your ultimate estimation of his parasitic pursuits? If people were foolish enough to come to him and offer him lots of money to post naked pictures of themselves on the web, he felt that his mission in life would be to charge them as much as possible.

There were certainly moments when I thought: this is really just an ordinary greedy guy who is a little bit more clever than the ordinary greedy guy. Yet, there was a certain strange logic in this greediness.

He had discovered a law that was so badly written that he could abuse it and take advantage [of it]. I also think it was a way for him to justify his own ends which were fairly simple: he wanted to make a million dollars. But he would not have wanted to do it had there not been an interesting complexity to it.

And it is probably something to do with needing attention. But not every get-rich-quick scheme ignites the same degree of passion in him. Like Don Quixote, he is the ultimate loser.

I think he has a grand self-image. It would be enough for an ordinary person to get rich with something unspectacular like lawn grass. But Laroche has a vision of himself as something larger than life. He is a loser if you compare him to normal standards of success. In his own mind he is not a loser because he really is living the life he wants to lead.

Did you retain a sense of remaining a distinct and separate being, or were you ever in danger of becoming part of the exotic blur?

I am not a hot weather person. On the other hand I think I am a person who is typical of Florida.

I came down there to find my own fortune. Like so many people I came to Florida with a scheme in mind: I wanted to write this book about this peculiar event that had taken place. But my connection was impermanent. It surprises me to realize I have written easily over half a dozen pieces down there. Part of that is the fact that interesting, strange things happen in Florida. It is a bubbling-stew of a place. And the kinds of stories that interest me, people starting new lives, creating new communities, happened in Florida.

Fate intervenes. Disappointment is deflected. And you are grateful. Is that how you rule your life? I try to figure out if there is destiny and fate or if life is just haphazard. What we search for is a kind of order and logic in what is the chaotic and illogical experience of being alive. I think you grab on to little footholds that make you think that there is logic and that there is some sense of order in your life. It is very funny how much we crave that.

I am almost delighted to have a fortune teller say to me, "Nothing is going to happen until January" because I feel relieved of that anticipation.

It is a comfort to think that there is something.

Sometimes I wonder how it is that I ended up as a writer. It seems, looking back on it, almost fated. On the other hand I am not sure. Do I believe that? It could never have matched all of the expectations that I was bringing to it. A ranger from the Fakahatchee called me after the book came out and said, "If you want to see a ghost orchid, I will take you to see one.

You can come down. I like just imagining it, as something irresistible and unattainable. One of these days I suspect I will see one.

It would be nice if it were by accident. I have talked to him.

And he said to me in his usual way, "You know, if you write a couple more books, you could turn into a pretty good writer.

Did you analyze your fascination with Laroche going beyond the objective interest in his passion? I only realize this now. Certainly, when I set out to write a book about flowers, I never thought it would be sexy. The Orchid Thief shows her gifts in full bloom. Just when you fear you're lost in the Everglades, she returns to the flower at hand, and unleashes some delirious prose Orlean shows great restraint and never adopts an orchid--readers may not manage to be so cold-blooded.

Here are visionary passions and fierce obsessions; heroic settings; outsize characters, entrepreneurs on the edge of the frontier, adventurers seeking the bubble reputation Orlean, an intrepid sociologist among the orchid fanatics, is also a poetic observer of the Fakahatchee swamp.

The Orchid Thief

There's an offhand brilliance in her accounts of its weird beauty and discomforts. But the most compelling sections of this fascinating book deal with the orchids themselves The Orchid Thief is a lesson in the dark, dangerous, sometimes hilarious nature of obsession--any obsession.

You sometimes don't want to read on, but find you can't help it. In prose as lush and full of surprises as the Fakahatchee itself, Orlean connects orchid-related excesses of the past with the exploits of the present so dramatically an orchid will never just be an orchid again. Like many orchids, it's a beautiful hybrid: Led by the title character, a charismatic plant smuggler, you'll journey with Orlean through a strangely fascinating, almost mystical subculture.

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Such rapturous evocations are reason enough to read Orlean's book. Susan Orlean is a perfect example In a dry reporter's style, spiked with wit and charged with infectious enthusiasm, Orlean explains orchid biology and traces the history of orchid hunting, scattering surprises as she goes An endearingly timid explorer who shudders each time she lowers herself into the teeming ooze of the Fakahatchee, Orlean is also an acute observer of the personalities and rivalries she encounters Orlean allows accidental discoveries and encounters to dicate the book's peculiar, engrossing course.

Its central figure is John Laroche, the 'oddball ultimate' of a subculture whose members are so enthralled by orchids they 'pursue them like lovers.Add to Wishlist.

Barbara Kingsolver. In a dry reporter's style, spiked with wit and charged with infectious enthusiasm, Orlean explains orchid biology and traces the history of orchid hunting, scattering surprises as she goes Walter Lord.

Ebook The Orchid Thief: A True Story of Beauty and Obsession (Ballantine Reader s Circle) Free

Born a Crime. He is a loser if you compare him to normal standards of success. But Laroche has a vision of himself as something larger than life. The title should be at least 4 characters long.