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IN THE BLINK OF AN EYE BOOK

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In The Blink of an Eye: A Perspective on Film Editing is a non-fiction filmmaking book on the art and craft of editing authored by Walter Murch. The book suggests . Walter Murch is the winner of multiple Academy Awards for his work as a film editor and a sound designer. Among his many notable credits are The. Start by marking “In the Blink of an Eye” as Want to Read: In the Blink of an Eye is celebrated film editor Walter Murch's vivid, multifaceted, thought-provoking essay on film editing. See 1 question about In the Blink of an Eye.


In The Blink Of An Eye Book

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In the Blink of an Eye is celebrated film editor Walter Murch's vivid, multifaceted, thought -- provoking essay on film editing. Starting with what might be the most. Murch, Walter. In the Blink of an Eye. A Perspective on Film Editing. 2nd Edition. resourceone.info Press Page 2. Page 3. Page 4. Page 5. Page 6. Page 7. Available in: Paperback. In the Blink of an Eye is celebrated editor Walter Murch's vivid, multifaceted, thought-provoking essay of film editing.

He refers to a spectrum of subjects you wouldn't normally associate with film, as well as his career experience of working with some of the most talented filmmakers around - George Lucas, Francis Coppola, Anthony Minghella to name a few - to enliven what could easily become rather abstract or dry subject matter.

He regularly draws parallels between historical artists working with other mediums and film editors sculpting works with keyboard and mouse or the machinery of traditional mechancial editors, in a way that helps deepen one's understanding of the creative process of editing. For instance, he notes that although digital film-editing systems offer many obvious advantages over mechnical editing - increased speed, reduced cost, fewer assistants, easier access to the editing room and so on - he suggests potential disadvantages by drawing a neat historical parallel.

The ability for one person to digitally edit a film will have removed a form of apprenticeship for film editors. They are my first audience. He goes on to explain how the blinks of our eyes punctuate our thought patterns and how the editor can use the actors' blinks to select his in or out points.

And I would suggest that there are similar points in every scene where the cut cannot or must occur, and for the same reasons. There are many practical nuggets of wisdom, like why he starts the editing process by laying out a series of representative stills from the movie and how he places little cut-out figures at the bottom of his computer screen to help create the illusion that he is editing for a big screen.

It would have been nice to have heard similar tips and tricks on solving tricky editing situations, but there are still plenty of welcome insights and ideas.

This remains a stimulating read for anyone interested in the film editing process. We can say to a young scared child, it was only a dream. Likewise, we do this with scary movies as well: it's only a movie.

Another interesting aspect of the book was his emphasis on paying attention to when actors blink. Murch noticed at some point in his career with Gene Hackman, that where Hackman blinked was often a good place to cut a sequence just before the blink.

A bad actor can often be spotted by the strange rhythmn of their blinking - it doesn't seem to be matching the emotional landscape of the story. They may be nervous our pre-occupied.

Murch has a chapter on all the new software out on editing film and he is still a bit skeptical it can deliver on all its claims. With the older technology, it required you to sift through alot of material, and sometimes you would come across footage that was just what you needed - footage you may have discarded before. He thinks the new technology will probably,in time, bridge the advantages of new and old.

But as of his writing, he still felt the older editing machines were better. It is a small book and a quick read. Well written. It's fun to come across a master of his field who writes so well about his craft.

It contains much the same and more content and is crafted by Ondaatje to emphasize not just Murch's genius, but also his humility and eager, genuine curiosity.Because you want to do only what is necessary to engage the imagination of the audience—suggestion is always more effective than exposition. Because you want to do only what is necessary to engage the imagination of the audience—suggestion is always more effective than exposition.

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At any rate, I believe "filmic" juxtapositions are taking place in the real world not only when we dream but also when we are awake. He regularly draws parallels between historical artists working with other mediums and film editors sculpting works with keyboard and mouse or the machinery of traditional mechancial editors, in a way that helps deepen one's understanding of the creative process of editing.

We can say to a young scared child, it was only a dream. That baby might be called "Blinkist".