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DESIGN CAPACITY TABLES FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL PDF

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their “Design Capacity Tables” text and format in the development of various parts The “Design Capacity Tables for Structural Steel” (DCT) suite of publications. 𝗣𝗗𝗙 | Structural steel is commonly used as construction material. In designing structural steel, practitioners typically use the steel section properties table to. Design Capacity Tables for Structural Steel Hollow resourceone.info - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or view presentation slides online.


Design Capacity Tables For Structural Steel Pdf

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Design Capacity Tables for Structural Steel Hollow Sections - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or view presentation slides online. C. AISC: DESIGN CAPACITY TABLES FOR STRUCTURAL STEEL DCT/02/. + Design Capacity Tables for structural steel. Volume 1: Open sections fifth edition - WB, WC – Grade / (to AS/NZS ). UB, UC – Grade /

Australian Steel Institute. Disclaimer: The information presented by the Australian Steel Institute in this publication has been prepared for general information only and does not in any way constitute recommendations or professional advice. While every effort has been made and all reasonable care taken to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, this information should not be used or relied upon for any specific application without investigation and verification as to its accuracy, suitability and applicability by a competent professional person in this regard.

The Australian Steel Institute, its officers and employees and the authors and editors of this publication do not give any warranties or make any representations in relation to the information provided herein and to the extent permitted by law a will not be held liable or responsible in any way; and b expressly disclaim any liability or responsibility for any loss or damage costs or expenses incurred in connection with this publication by any person, whether that person is the purchaser of this publication or not.

Without limitation, this includes loss, damage, costs and expenses incurred as a result of the negligence of the authors, editors or publishers. The information in this publication should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent due diligence, professional or legal advice and in this regards the services of a competent professional person or persons should be sought. The ASI is the nation s peak body representing and serving the steel industry.

The ASI achieves industry and professional development by conducting regular seminars, publishing technical manuals available through its own bookshop, operating the largest steel industry library in the Southern Hemisphere, by delivering guest lectures at colleges and universities, and hosting a range of national and statebased committees providing cross-industry representation. Acknowledgements The majority of data in this fifth edition has been recalculated to provide increased significant figures as noted below , updates based on known issues or new information not present in the previous edition in particular the new Grade tables.

All recalculated data has been rigorously checked against either existing data or data calculated using alternative means. ASI gratefully acknowledges this contribution. Calculation Basis The calculations undertaken for the data presented in this fifth edition were based on the full precision of a 64 bit microprocessor.

Prior to this initiative, one of the limitations with tubular construction was the restricted range of large readily available hollow sections that are fully compliant with Australian Standards. Consequently, this and several other OneSteel Australian Tube Mills publications have been produced in landscape format. For additional information, readers should also refer to page ii for the appropriate use of this DCTHS.

As a complementary design aid to this publication, OneSteel Australian Tube Mills has also produced a simple calculator for structural steel hollow sections designed to AS It is interesting to note that after nearly twenty years since the release of the first DCTHS, the same basic team involved in the first document has been brought together to develop this publication. This team includes engineers for computations, content and project management as well as graphic designers.

Accordingly, we trust this publication is of value to designers of hollow section construction and would appreciate any feedback on its adequacy or ways to refine it. May your designs in tubular construction be fruitful ones! The Tables use Le and L in lieu of le and l respectively as noted in AS to avoid confusion with the standard typeface used. Other references are listed at the end of the initial text portion in each respective Part of the publication i.

Standard and Other References The Australian Standards referred to in this publication are centrally listed in Section 1. Table 5.

It should be noted that the main tables listing design capacities and other member information are placed at the end of the initial text portion of each Part of this publication. The base units utilised in the Tables are newton N for force. Extensive research [1. The main tables will generally be listed within a numerical sequence — e. Table T2.

Section 2 should be consulted for further details on the structural steel hollow sections considered in the Tables. Where noted. With some minor exceptions.

As far as possible. For example. It should be noted that other checks on the beam may be necessary — e. When using the Tables. Relevant limit states for structural steel include strength. Only two limit states are considered in the Tables — the strength limit state and. In this state it ceases to perform the functions or to satisfy the conditions for which it was designed.

For flexure. Where applicable. Where relevant. Some useful information for checking the serviceability limit state is included in the Tables. When considering external loads. Ru is determined from the characteristic values and specified parameters found in Sections 5 to 9 of AS Australian Institute of Steel Construction.

Steel Construction. Journal of Structural Engineering. American Society of Civil Engineers. Such wording may be: This becomes much more important for hollow sections with larger thickness i. Further general information on the availability of the sections listed in the Tables is noted in Section 2. To ensure the assumptions.

CL0 is based on the nominal minimum yield strength of the steel in MPa. The section sizes and their respective grades listed in the Tables include: Hollow sections rated with impact properties such as L0 are not only important in lower temperature environments but also for welded structures subject to dynamic loads.

The ERW process allows cold-formed hollow sections to be welded at ambient temperatures without subsequent stress relieving. In conjunction with the above structural steel hollow section Standard and grade designations.

CL0 and CL0. In practice the tabulated values are affected by rolling tolerances and actual corner shape. More detailed information on the strengths and other mechanical properties of these steels can be found in Table 2. The Grade CL0 products provide a more comprehensive range of sections for structural applications and should be commonly specified.

See Section 2. Masses per metre listed are for the sections only. Grade CL0 by itself may not perform well if the hollow section is bent to a tight radius during fabrication e. If the same section can comply with the requirements of both the commonly specified lower strength grade and the structurally efficient higher strength grade. These properties undergo opposing effects during manufacturing.

Excess straining sometimes produces section failures. It is often perceived that CL0 is a new and less readily available grade. These elongation limits apply to the face from which the tensile test is taken. As noted in Section 2. Dual-stocking of grades for a particular section is costly. Experience has shown that Grade CL0 products which possess the CL0 elongation requirements can be adequately formed in these situations.

Apart from higher strength and lighter weight benefits. These and other publications and software can be obtained freely from www. This is particularly so for thicker hollow sections. As noted above.

The above table shows that higher strengths are developed in Grade CL0 products and higher elongation is attained with Grade CL0 products.

This situation is highly dependent on the integrity of the supporting material Standards. OneSteel Australian Tube Mills are regarded as being innovative in various mill finishes for many years and offer tubular products in the following surface finishes: The other important Standards for structural steel hollow sections include welding.

Though AS is a key Standard for the design. It should be noted that due to manufacturing limitations. This includes taking account of the enhancement in strength due to cold-forming. Non-conforming or unidentified hollow sections must be down-rated to a design yield stress of MPa and a design ultimate strength of MPa. September Note: It is highly recommended that readers always ensure that they are using current information on the OSATM product range.

Sections may be ordered in other lengths ex-mill rolling subject to OSATM length limitations and minimum order requirements. See Section 1. It should be noted that Clause 5. The above calculation method of J and C is extracted from Ref. Ratios and Properties The Tables give standard dimensions and properties for the structural steel hollow sections noted in Sections 2.

Sy and the torsion constant J are the fundamental geometric properties required by design Standards. These properties. J and C are calculated by the traditional methods. For CHS. Figure 3. The section form factor kf. The equations for determining Ze reflect the proportion of the hollow section that is effective in resisting compression in the section caused by flexure.

N or S respectively. Clause 4. In Clauses 5. Zey are tabulated. This parameter is based on the section moduli S. These values are dependent on steel grade. Corner Geometry for Determining Section Properties 3. General worked examples for calculating Ze are provided in Section 3. Ze is then calculated using Clauses 5. From Table 5. This categorisation provides a measure of the relative importance of yielding and local buckling of the plate elements which make up a section when subject to compression caused by bending.

Having evaluated the compactness of a hollow section. All relevant data are obtained from Table 3. From Table 6. From Clause 5. The calculation of kf indicates the degree to which the plate elements which make up the column section will buckle locally before squashing i. Determine Zex and kf for a x x 8.

The form factor kf is defined in Clause 6. General worked examples for calculating kf are provided in Section 3. The evaluation of kf is also important when designing to the higher tier provisions for members subject to combined actions as noted in Section 8 of AS Owing to dimensional tolerances permitted within that Standard actual clearances of sections manufactured to this specification will vary marginally from the values tabulated.

For tight fits. Within these tables the total available clearance is tabulated to allow designers to select hollow sections with suitable clearance for the type of fit required. Telescoping of SHS and RHS where the female outer has a larger wall thickness requires careful consideration of corner clearance due to the larger corner radii of the thicker section. Parameters for Telescoping Tables Figure 3. Where telescoping over some length is required. Further information and worked examples on fire design to Section 12 of AS can be found in Refs.

Telescoping Sections For unprotected steel hollow sections the values of ksm corresponding to four. Typical corner geometry may differ from that used for the calculation of section properties and reference should be made to OneSteel Australian Tube Mills for further information see contact details at the bottom of the page. It should be noted that ksm is equivalent to E in Ref. Sections with clearances less than 2. For members requiring the addition of fire protection materials.

Tables 3. Australian Steel Institute. International Standards Organisation. Australian Institute of Steel Construction..

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For Grade CL0: TABLE 3. This product is also compliant with AS — Steel tubes and tubulars for ordinary service. The PAG can be found at www. Grey shaded listings are to CL0 which is a non-standard grade. Please refer to earlier tables for design values associated with this as a standard grade. See Section 3. See Tables 3. For tight fits it is recommended that some form of testing is carried out prior to committing to material.

Note that the clearance is the total available difference between member dimensions.

Select the size of Female or Outer member closest to your requirements from the left hand column. Press Fit: Depending on the two members being telescoped. Where two telescoping sections are being used. Pipe may need to be fixed against twisting by welding or bolting. Sizes where clearance is shown as 0. Members may need to slide freely inside each other. This means. If a third section is to be used. Sizes with a clearance less than 2. Based on A and B above. The next column lists the closest size Male Inner Member when positioned in the Female Member as noted in the Figure at the bottom right of this page.

Corner Geometry for Determining Section Properties 3. General worked examples for calculating Ze are provided in Section 3. Ze is then calculated using Clauses 5. Figure 3.

Design Capacity Tables for Structural Steel Hollow Sections

Having evaluated the compactness of a hollow section. The equations for determining Ze reflect the proportion of the hollow section that is effective in resisting compression in the section caused by flexure. This categorisation provides a measure of the relative importance of yielding and local buckling of the plate elements which make up a section when subject to compression caused by bending. This parameter is based on the section moduli S. From Table 5. Z and is used in the determination of the design section moment capacity qMs.

N or S respectively. Clause 4. In Clauses 5.

These values are dependent on steel grade. The calculation of kf indicates the degree to which the plate elements which make up the column section will buckle locally before squashing i. All relevant data are obtained from Table 3. From Clause 5. The form factor kf is defined in Clause 6. The evaluation of kf is also important when designing to the higher tier provisions for members subject to combined actions as noted in Section 8 of AS From Table 6.

General worked examples for calculating kf are provided in Section 3. To assist with the design of structural steel hollow sections for fire resistance Section 12 of AS , values of the exposed surface area to mass ratio ksm are presented in Tables 3. For unprotected steel hollow sections the values of ksm corresponding to four- and three-sided exposure should be taken as those corresponding to Cases 1 and 4 respectively in Figure 3.

Tables 3.

Within these tables the total available clearance is tabulated to allow designers to select hollow sections with suitable clearance for the type of fit required. Sections with clearances less than 2.

For members requiring the addition of fire protection materials, Ref. It should be noted that ksm is equivalent to E in Ref. Further information and worked examples on fire design to Section 12 of AS can be found in Refs. Owing to dimensional tolerances permitted within that Standard actual clearances of sections manufactured to this specification will vary marginally from the values tabulated. For tight fits, varying corner radii and internal weld heights can affect telescoping of sections and it is recommended that some form of testing is carried out prior to committing material.

Where telescoping over some length is required, additional clearance may be needed to allow for straightness of the section. Telescoping of SHS and RHS where the female outer has a larger wall thickness requires careful consideration of corner clearance due to the larger corner radii of the thicker section.

Typical corner geometry may differ from that used for the calculation of section properties and reference should be made to Australian Tube Mills for further information see contact details at the bottom of the page. Cases of fire exposure considered: Bradford, M. Proe, D. Thomas, I. Rakic, J. The PAG can be found at www. For Grade CL0: This product is also compliant with AS — Steel tubes and tubulars for ordinary service. TABLE 3. Grey shaded listings are to CL0 which is a non-standard grade - availability is subject to minimum order criteria.

Please refer to earlier tables for design values associated with this as a standard grade. Grey shaded listings are to CL0 which is a non-standard grade. See Section 3.

See Tables 3. The next column lists the closest size Male Inner Member when positioned in the Female Member as noted in the Figure at the bottom right of this page. This means. Where two telescoping sections are being used. Select the size of Female or Outer member closest to your requirements from the left hand column. CHS is not a precision tube and all dimensions shown in this chart. The configuration of these Nominal Clearances are as shown in the Figure below.

Sizes where clearance is shown as 0. Internal weld bead may need to be considered when a closer fit is required. Pipe may need to be fixed against twisting by welding or bolting. Note that the clearance is the total available difference between member dimensions.

Press Fit: Based on A and B above. Members may need to slide freely inside each other. Sizes with a clearance less than 2.

Depending on the two members being telescoped.

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If a third section is to be used. For tight fits it is recommended that some form of testing is carried out prior to committing to material. Where telescoping over some length is required. If a third section is to be used consideration of both clearance and thickness within the size list available may be required. RHS is not a precision tube and all dimensions shown in this chart. RHS has the obvious advantage that its shape prevents rotation of the section.

Varying corner radii and the internal weld bead may need to be considered when a closer fit is required. SHS is not a precision tube and all dimensions shown in this chart. SHS has the obvious advantage that its shape prevents rotation of the section. Secondorder effects may be substantial in some frames. The methods of analysis recognised by AS are: If bb is greater than 1.

All of the methods of analysis are discussed in detail in the commentary to AS Ref. From an AS perspective. A first-order elastic analysis with moment amplification cannot be used if bb is greater than 1. The moment amplification factor is calculated differently for braced and sway members as explained in the following sub-section.

Second-order effects. A first-order elastic analysis alone does not consider second-order effects. These Design Capacity Tables are intended to be used with first-order and second-elastic analysis.

If a first-order elastic analysis is carried out then bb is used to amplify the bending moments between the ends of the member Clause 4.

These four methods consider the interaction of load and deformation that produce second-order effects. Alternatively a second-order elastic analysis in accordance with Appendix E of AS may be used. Some further consideration of hand methods for assessing second-order effects and subsequently design actions are noted in the balance of this part of the publication. This occurs for both isolated. The moment amplification factor for a braced member is bb.

As such. For simple structural members. With respect to AS In first-order analysis. If a braced member is subject only to end moments then the factor cm is calculated as follows: Clauses 4. If bm is greater than 1. The design bending moment is given by: A detailed explanation of the procedure for calculating bs may be Compute Nomb from Clause 4.

The bending moments calculated from a first-order elastic analysis are modified by the moment amplification factor bm which is the greater of bb see Section 4. The moment amplification factor for a sway member is bs. If the member is subjected to transverse loading. Figure 4. Flow Chart for the calculation of the moment amplification factor for a braced member. Nomy are required for the calculation of bb and bm.

For braced or sway members in frames. No tables relating Nom to effective length are provided in this publication. For a specific effective length. Ix or Iy and then simply evaluate the above equation for Nom.

Values of Nom are determined from Clause 4. Flow Chart for the calculation of the moment amplification factor for a sway member. Braced Beam-Column Determine the design action effects for an isolated braced beam-column which is subject to the design actions from a first-order elastic analysis as noted in Figure 4.

Design action effects on isolated braced beam-column Design Data: Axial compression flexural buckling x-axis.

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Examples 1. Standards Australia.

Australian Steel Institute Sway Beam-Column Due to space limitations.. These tables were rarely used and could be readily calculated by manual methods as noted in the example above. AS Supplement Tables 5.

For the beam configuration shown in Figure 5. For a specific group of hollow sections. An example on the use of these tables is given in Section 5. The design moment capacity for the beam in Figure 5. For a single-span simply-supported beam subject to uniformly distributed loading see Figure 5.

The A series tables in this instance consider the strength limit state. For Tables 5. Examples of the use of these tables are given in Section 5. Beam configuration for Tables 5.

Formulae for calculating FLR are given in Clause 5. For a single-span. FLR values are given in the A series of Tables 5. The load at which first yield occurs in the member is given by: As noted in Tables 5. FLR is only listed in the strength not serviceability limit state tables A.

The B series tables in this instance consider the serviceability limit state. Section 5. An example of the use of these Tables is given in Section 5. If not. Steps 6 and 7 only work if first yield does not control. If it does. Beam with Uniformly Distributed Load A simply-supported beam of 4 metres span is subjected to the following unfactored uniformly distributed loads: Beam with Central Concentrated Load A beam which is simply-supported has a span of 4.

Serviceability Limit State — From Table 5. From Table T5. It can be seen from Table 5. The beam is subjected to nominal. For illustrative purposes. Due to SHS being doubly-symmetric. These actions are split into two separate tables — the type A table for bending about the x-axis e. CHS are not considered in the 5. These values provide the basic information necessary for checking shear-bending interaction.

FLR values may be used to ensure appropriate spacing of restraints so that the design section moment capacity can be achieved for bending about the x-axis. Nominal beam self weight. For RHS bending about the x-axis. The Tables also provide values of design web bearing capacities.

The method for determining the constants C and J is detailed in Section 3. The theory assumes that all cross-sections rotate as a body around the centre of rotation. An explanation of torsional effects is provided in Refs. For hollow sections. The general theory of torsion established by Saint-Venant is based on uniform torsion.FLR values may be used to ensure appropriate spacing of restraints so that the design section moment capacity can be achieved for bending about the x-axis.

There was no ready answer to this frustration and confusion — unless. Steel Construction. March Note: Examples 1. Table T5. The design bending moment is given by: From an AS perspective.