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ARASHI NO YORU NI BOOK

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Arashi no Yoru ni (あらしのよるに?, lit. One Stormy Night) is the first in a series of children's books authored by Yūichi Kimura and illustrated by Hiroshi Abe. Arashi no Yoru ni is the first in a series of children's books authored by Yūichi Kimura and illustrated by Hiroshi Abe. In , the. Arashi No Yoru Ni on resourceone.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.


Arashi No Yoru Ni Book

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Published (Last):05.11.2015
ISBN:634-4-30483-291-1
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Animation - Arashi No Yoru Ni Himitsu No Tomodachi 2 [Japan DVD] BCBA Stick with Keiko Kasza's Wolf's Chicken Stew (Putnam, ) for a book. Arashi no Yoru ni ("One Stormy Night"), a Japanese children's book and Japanese animated film about the deeply romantic friendship (or . The popularity of the "Arashi no Yoruni" series has slowly but surely spread It's become a major bestselling series with a total of million books sold thus far.

The first company I worked for made mannequins, and the second was a design office where I even experienced a company outing. I figured I'd eventually use my experience in a story about company trips. Great Mazinger was a popular children's comic book series in the s. I also made posters for department stores using silk screen technique. You see, my father had passed away when I was only ten years old, so I grew up with a sense of responsibility, always feeling that I would eventually have to support my whole family.

Of course, if I had really just been looking for economic stability, I probably would have been better off becoming a lawyer or something. That's why, even when I was working for a company, I wouldn't rest on weekends but would spend all my weekends and holidays trying to work at something involved with publishing.

I wrote the first book just around the time my "Baby's Play Books" series Kaiseisha had become bestsellers. Because these baby books were so popular, I kept getting asked for more baby-oriented picture books. But I wanted to be a real writer - I simply couldn't be satisfied with just writing baby books. I began to want a broader audience for my work. The success of my picture books, in a sense, became my own worst enemy. I was afraid of being forever branded as "A Baby Book Writer" and wanted to write what I felt like writing.

The idea of being identified with a specific type or style of book abhorred me. I also wanted to create a brand for myself which had absolutely nothing to do with "Baby Books".

I didn't really care if these were going to sell or not - and I started writing stories. One of those was "Arashi no Yoru ni". The idea for this book goes all the way back to "Uteki" Raindrops , one of the stories I wrote for the literary magazine I'd started in high school.

Come to think of it, this book may stem from when I first decided to become a writer. When I first wrote "Arashi no Yoruni" , it was intended as a stand-alone and not a series. But gradually, it became so popular that I decided to write a sequel.

Then, while I was writing the second book, I started wanting to write a third. Since the goat's friends make an appearance in the third book, I decided the wolf should also have friends showing up - in a 4th volume.

Old Review: Arashi no Yoru Ni

At the point I was writing the 5th book, I realized it would have to be a 6-book series. Well, they were named out of necessity more than anything else. Up to the second book, it was only the two of them so they didn't need names.

But from the third book, there were other goats and wolves showing up, so they needed to have to something to call each other. That's why I decided the wolf should be called "Gabu" and the goat would be "Mei". Since wolves devour their prey, I used the Japanese word for "devour" and used "Gabu". The goat became "Mei" because that's how we describe the way goats cry in Japan.

When an English version is eventually published, I'd like to choose names which will have similar connotations in English. What sort of image did you have in mind? Well, there was a limit to the word count for this book. Most of this story is in dialog and that doesn't leave much room for description. I wanted the reader to easily be able to distinguish between the wolf and the goat based on how they spoke.

On the other hand, the goat is an educated and rather intellectual type from the upper classes. I think I was able to create these images quite effectively by using these different dialects.

I'd repeatedly visited the Bologna Children's Book Fair, and eventually became acquainted with a certain Italian translator. This person was kind enough to introduce me to an appropriate publisher and that's how this book got translated.

Mei, knowing that Gabu has not eaten in days, offers to sacrifice himself as sustenance. Gabu reluctantly agrees initially, but soon realizes that no matter how hungry he is, he cannot eat his friend. Gabu hears his pack approaching and leaves Mei to face them, ready to defend his goat friend to the death. As Gabu is about to go face the wolf pack, there is an avalanche which sweeps them all away.

The next morning, Mei digs through the snow blocking the cave and sees the "emerald forest" they had been searching for in the distance. Gabu is missing, but Mei finds him in another cave. Mei finds that Gabu has lost his memory of their friendship and all the events that preceded the avalanche due to the trauma of surviving that disaster, and Mei knows not how to undo the damage.

While waiting for the moon to come out, Gabu taunts Mei that he plans on eating him.

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Mei, saying that he wouldn't have minded being eaten by Gabu before, accuses the wolf of not being the Gabu he previously knew and deems him pathetic for not even attempting to remember his past. Disappointed and disillusioned, Mei shouts that had he known things would take this turn it would have been better if they had never met each other on "one stormy night". Of course, if I had really just been looking for economic stability, I probably would have been better off becoming a lawyer or something.

That's why, even when I was working for a company, I wouldn't rest on weekends but would spend all my weekends and holidays trying to work at something involved with publishing. Kimura: I wrote the first book just around the time my "Baby's Play Books" series Kaiseisha had become bestsellers.

Because these baby books were so popular, I kept getting asked for more baby-oriented picture books. But I wanted to be a real writer - I simply couldn't be satisfied with just writing baby books. I began to want a broader audience for my work.

The success of my picture books, in a sense, became my own worst enemy. I was afraid of being forever branded as "A Baby Book Writer" and wanted to write what I felt like writing. The idea of being identified with a specific type or style of book abhorred me. I also wanted to create a brand for myself which had absolutely nothing to do with "Baby Books".

I didn't really care if these were going to sell or not - and I started writing stories. One of those was "Arashi no Yoru ni".

The idea for this book goes all the way back to "Uteki" Raindrops , one of the stories I wrote for the literary magazine I'd started in high school. Come to think of it, this book may stem from when I first decided to become a writer. Kimura: When I first wrote "Arashi no Yoruni", it was intended as a stand-alone and not a series. But gradually, it became so popular that I decided to write a sequel. Then, while I was writing the second book, I started wanting to write a third.

Since the goat's friends make an appearance in the third book, I decided the wolf should also have friends showing up - in a 4th volume.

At the point I was writing the 5th book, I realized it would have to be a 6-book series. Kimura: Well, they were named out of necessity more than anything else. Up to the second book, it was only the two of them so they didn't need names.

Arashi No Yoru Ni

But from the third book, there were other goats and wolves showing up, so they needed to have to something to call each other. That's why I decided the wolf should be called "Gabu" and the goat would be "Mei". Since wolves devour their prey, I used the Japanese word for "devour" and used "Gabu". The goat became "Mei" because that's how we describe the way goats cry in Japan. When an English version is eventually published, I'd like to choose names which will have similar connotations in English.

What sort of image did you have in mind? Kimura: Well, there was a limit to the word count for this book.

Most of this story is in dialog and that doesn't leave much room for description. I wanted the reader to easily be able to distinguish between the wolf and the goat based on how they spoke.

On the other hand, the goat is an educated and rather intellectual type from the upper classes. I think I was able to create these images quite effectively by using these different dialects. Kimura: I'd repeatedly visited the Bologna Children's Book Fair, and eventually became acquainted with a certain Italian translator.

This person was kind enough to introduce me to an appropriate publisher and that's how this book got translated.While waiting for the moon to come out, Gabu taunts Mei that he plans on eating him. Standard International Shipping. Community Reviews.

Email to friends Share on Facebook - opens in a new window or tab Share on Twitter - opens in a new window or tab Share on Pinterest - opens in a new window or tab. Its issues like this that creates both light hearted humour and really dramatic moments and while watching it I really found myself caring for the two and hoping that they would make it all the way to the end, and the film is written so that the ending could be more than one possibility.

But due to the popularity of the story and receiving considerable encouragement, he continued the story through five more books, ending with "Fubuki no Ashita After the Snowstorm. There are 1 items available. Lekay Trance marked it as to-read Sep 12, Poor Communication Kills : Subverted at Mei and Gabu's first meeting; it's because the pair aren't specific about what they mean by "food" that they can get along