resourceone.info Fitness Javascript Code For Pdf

JAVASCRIPT CODE FOR PDF

Monday, May 13, 2019


You can also place JavaScript in its own file and name it inside your HTML. That way, you can keep different types of code separate from one. In this tutorial, learn how to code Acrobat JavaScript, including testing and debugging code with the Acrobat JavaScript Console window. In this tutorial, learn how to code Adobe JavaScript to create a custom A dynamic stamp is created by adding form fields to an existing PDF.


Javascript Code For Pdf

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons attribution-noncommercial license (resourceone.info). All code in the book may . Now that we have the files and have given them a home, let's get started with the fun stuff -- JavaScript code. Get your CTRL keys ready, cut-and-pasters. Probably you are looking for JavaScript™ for Acrobat® API Reference. This reference should be the most complete. But, as @Orbling said, not.

We can use it anytime we want to execute code for any purpose.

Two uses for the Console Window besides code testing that immediately come to mind are automation and analysis. There are several functions in Acrobat for manipulating and for acquiring information from PDFs and Acrobat. For operations with a user interface button or menu item, the main advantage of using JavaScript is greater flexibility, since JavaScript functions typically provide more options than the user interface equivalent.

For example, suppose you wanted to know the exact border color of a text field so you could use the same color in another location. Assuming the current document has a field with the correct name on it, the following code displays the raw color value in the Console Window: this. Remember, Acrobat attempts to convert all results into text.

Arrays are converted to text by converting each individual array element into a text string, so the result would look something like the following line when it is displayed in the Console Window.

We've just found out something that would have taken us just a little more effort to find out using the Acrobat property dialogs, and the information is in a very usable format. We can easily copy and paste this information to accomplish some other purpose, for example applying the color to another field with this line of code: this.

Suppose a document needs to be checked for branding purposes, i. It has to be done all at once. Notice that in the loop there is a function called console.

It's in the fourth line.

This function writes text to the Console Window and it will be discussed in the next section. Here's an example of a function that does not have an easy equivalent on the regular Acrobat menus and toolbars.

JavaScript Code

Enter the following line into the Console Window and run it: app. This is perfect for trying out new ideas before applying them to a working document. The results of this operation are shown in Figure 7 below. Note that yet again, the result is something different. The Console Window has to convert the result of code execution to text before it can be displayed. Not everything has an obviously meaningful text representation. In this case, the output of the function is a Document Object.

Objects are converted to text by simply converting their type information to a string. The result shown in Figure 7 tells us the type of object created.

This result is only useful in letting us know the function worked. If app. Both of these situations would have been displayed in the Console Window. Enter and run the following line of code: this.

It's the folder path of the current document. Since the current document was just created with app. The advantage to using the Console Window is to make this information available to copy to the system clipboard for use with another script in Acrobat or for something else.

Using the Console to display status and error messages Besides testing code, the Console Window has one other important role in debugging JavaScript. It is the standard location for displaying status and error messages.

The Acrobat JavaScript environment has a built-in error handling system. When something goes wrong, this error-handling system usually displays some helpful message sometimes in the Console Window, so this is the first place to look when things aren't working. In addition, you can create your own status and error messages to display here. As an example, let's execute something that will cause an error.

Enter and run the following line of code in the Console Window: app. Acrobat responds by generating an error, which is displayed by the Console Window, shown in Figure 8. This message is critical to understanding why the code failed, especially if the function call is buried in several lines of code inside another script. Always check the Console Window first when something goes wrong. Note that the second message on the line indicates a security error.

For our purposes, this is an erroneous and unhelpful message. There was no real security error, and while it may then seem that Adobe is deliberately trying to either terrify or confuse us, there is a reason the message is being displayed. In fact, the message is not related to the JavaScript engine at all. It is the result of the Acrobat security model, which was made much more robust in versions 9, X, and XI by adding a security layer.

This layer blocks operations that don't fit with Acrobat's sense of rightness.

JavaScript operations or errors that relate to external resources on the web or local file system tend to spook this security layer, which then throws out miscellaneous security errors. If you work with Acrobat JavaScript for any length of time, you'll find all sorts of operations that have nothing to do with security, but nonetheless generate security errors. We can also create our own messages for display in the Console Window.

This object provides a few functions for manipulating and accessing the Console Window, but for our purposes here the console. This function displays a single line of text on the next available line in the Console Window. The following line of code displays the words "Hello Acrobat.

Just place a few console. This function writes text to the Console Window and it will be discussed in the next section. Here's an example of a function that does not have an easy equivalent on the regular Acrobat menus and toolbars. Enter the following line into the Console Window and run it: app.

This is perfect for trying out new ideas before applying them to a working document. The results of this operation are shown in Figure 7 below. Note that yet again, the result is something different. The Console Window has to convert the result of code execution to text before it can be displayed.

Not everything has an obviously meaningful text representation. In this case, the output of the function is a Document Object. Objects are converted to text by simply converting their type information to a string. The result shown in Figure 7 tells us the type of object created.

How to Add JavaScript Functionality to PDF Forms without Coding

This result is only useful in letting us know the function worked. If app. Both of these situations would have been displayed in the Console Window. Enter and run the following line of code: this. It's the folder path of the current document. Since the current document was just created with app. The advantage to using the Console Window is to make this information available to copy to the system clipboard for use with another script in Acrobat or for something else.

Using the Console to display status and error messages Besides testing code, the Console Window has one other important role in debugging JavaScript. It is the standard location for displaying status and error messages. The Acrobat JavaScript environment has a built-in error handling system. When something goes wrong, this error-handling system usually displays some helpful message sometimes in the Console Window, so this is the first place to look when things aren't working.

In addition, you can create your own status and error messages to display here. As an example, let's execute something that will cause an error. Enter and run the following line of code in the Console Window: app.

Acrobat responds by generating an error, which is displayed by the Console Window, shown in Figure 8. This message is critical to understanding why the code failed, especially if the function call is buried in several lines of code inside another script. Always check the Console Window first when something goes wrong.

Note that the second message on the line indicates a security error. For our purposes, this is an erroneous and unhelpful message. There was no real security error, and while it may then seem that Adobe is deliberately trying to either terrify or confuse us, there is a reason the message is being displayed.

Browser Support

In fact, the message is not related to the JavaScript engine at all. It is the result of the Acrobat security model, which was made much more robust in versions 9, X, and XI by adding a security layer.

This layer blocks operations that don't fit with Acrobat's sense of rightness. JavaScript operations or errors that relate to external resources on the web or local file system tend to spook this security layer, which then throws out miscellaneous security errors.

If you work with Acrobat JavaScript for any length of time, you'll find all sorts of operations that have nothing to do with security, but nonetheless generate security errors.

Adding JavaScript References to the Acrobat Pro 6 Help Menu

We can also create our own messages for display in the Console Window. This object provides a few functions for manipulating and accessing the Console Window, but for our purposes here the console. This function displays a single line of text on the next available line in the Console Window. The following line of code displays the words "Hello Acrobat. Just place a few console.

It is up to the developer to decide what information to display. This information should be relevant to the state of the script. For example, the following line helps us understand how JavaScript events work in Acrobat. The code can be placed in any script location in a PDF file. It is a good practice to use this code or something like it whenever you start a new document scripting project to get a feel for how the different scripts will interact.

Adobe added Console Window support to Reader in version 7. However, setting up Reader to actually display the Console Window was very difficult. It required installing special scripts and manually changing Acrobat settings in either the Windows Registry or the Macintosh settings files.

The Acrobat JavaScript Console (Your best friend for developing Acrobat JavaScript)

It has become much easier in Reader XI. There is only one thing you need to be able to do to use the Console Window, and that is to display it. Displaying the Console Window in Reader is a bit more difficult than one might think it should.

Reader does not have the keyboard shortcut, a menu item, or a tool button for displaying the Debugger Window. This leaves only two options: create your own tool button or menu item or cause a deliberate error. By default, there is only one option on it relating to the JavaScript Debugger, which is to "Show console on errors or messages.Since the current document was just created with app.

They are not as comprehensive as the reference docs listed here, but in the books there are some realistic use-cases discussed in context.

Javascript is just a nice addition. API almost the same as in original libtiff. Acrobat responds by generating an error, which is displayed by the Console Window, shown in Figure 8.

Let's focus on the Javascript part only. For our purposes, this is an erroneous and unhelpful message.