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THE SECRET LIFE OF PLANTS BOOK

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The Secret Life of Plants () is a book by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird. The book documents controversial experiments that claim to reveal unusual . Buy The Secret Life of Plants on resourceone.info ✓ FREE SHIPPING on qualified orders. The Secret Life of Plants book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Exploring the world of plants and its relation to mankin.


The Secret Life Of Plants Book

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Explore the inner world of plants and its fascinating relation to mankind, The Secret Life of Plants . Alien Plants (Collins New Naturalist Library, Book ). Published in , The Secret Life of Plants was written by Peter Tompkins and Essentially, the subject of the book is the idea that plants may be sentient. The Secret Life of Plants by Peter Tompkins, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.

Secret life of plants

Tuned to the Music of the Spheres The Harmonic Life of Plants Plants and Electromagnetism Force Fields, Humans and Plants Children of the Soil The Staff of Life Chemicals, Plants and Man Live Plants or Dead Planets Alchemists in the Garden Part V: The Radiance of Life Dowsing Plants for Health Radionic Pesticides Mind Over Matter Findhorn and the Garden of Eden Bibliography Index You may have already requested this item.

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Secret Life Of Plants

Would you also like to submit a review for this item? You already recently rated this item. I know you're thinking of course a vegan is going to like this book. But, it almost scares me. I mean.. I need another copy of this book though cause I didn't finish it. I ended up giving it away Jan 23, Laura rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a weird and amazing book.

I would recommend this book only to people who love plants and gardening. Basically, the book is trying to prove that plants have "feelings" and are extremely sensitive to human thought. They back up many of their theories with scientific studies I was reading this book in my living room near my houseplants and at one point, looked up to apologize to how poorly I treat them!

Poor darlings Much of this book connects directly to what I am doing with my artwork, so I found it extremely interesting and enjoyable. I was able to mine a lot of ideas for future projects. There are several things that he touched on that I would like to investigate further. All living things respond to kindness and concern, why not plants? It's not such a strange idea. I, for one, have started paying better attention to my houseplants and plan to extend some of the ideas in the book to my vegetable gardens.

It can't hurt and it just might help. A gardener can always dream! Sep 02, Dennis rated it really liked it. This is a great book to peruse so long as you don't get hung up on the over-evaluations of the authors. It is very important to keep an open mind throughout the entire read, as the authors use quite an open dose of Writer's License, and many of the intended hypotheses have since been proven one way or the other some of the major and emotional hypotheses having since been proven false and other things are just downright incorrect Washington-Carver and peanut butter.

There are some marvelous i This is a great book to peruse so long as you don't get hung up on the over-evaluations of the authors.

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There are some marvelous insight, however, despite all of those oversights and do please remember the amount of scientific discoveries since the early s Overall a great read for open-minded individuals, but there are points that will make you cringe if you are used to scientific process or involved in any way with studies in Biology. Apr 06, Lea rated it it was amazing Shelves: I don't know where I found this book, what compelled me to buy it, or why I started reading it, seeing that I had never sought it out or knew anybody else that had ever read it.

It's almost as if this book found me. Or maybe a plant willed it to happen somewhere. This book follows the studies of various scientists that have proposed that plants not only have the ability to feel pain and other human emotions, but can also anticipate them, adding psychic and telepathic to the list of abilities tha I don't know where I found this book, what compelled me to buy it, or why I started reading it, seeing that I had never sought it out or knew anybody else that had ever read it.

This book follows the studies of various scientists that have proposed that plants not only have the ability to feel pain and other human emotions, but can also anticipate them, adding psychic and telepathic to the list of abilities that plants have. In one of the experiments, a plant could anticipate and feel the pain of some live brine shrimp getting boiled in the next room.

It is full of crack-pot scientific ideas that have been dismissed by the scientific community because of their unprovability. I loved every chapter of this book. Jan 04, eoin rated it it was amazing Shelves: I came across this book in a second-hand bookstore in Antigua, Guatemala, complete with colourful wild crayon scribblings inside the covers.

The previous owner was obviously a precocious four year old. What an extraordinary book this is. It doesn't follow the orthodox well-trodden scientific pathway. Some parts are recognisably connected to "regular" science, and some are plainly looney.

Mainstream science in many ways is blinkered, and incapable of considering a lot of the radical material cove I came across this book in a second-hand bookstore in Antigua, Guatemala, complete with colourful wild crayon scribblings inside the covers. Mainstream science in many ways is blinkered, and incapable of considering a lot of the radical material covered here.

The most important thing however is that throughout runs a thread which recognises the undeniable connections that exist between all living things, human beings and plants obviously included. This is an astonishing audacious fascinating and gorgeous book. With or without crayon drawings. Mar 28, Joel rated it it was amazing. This book is what really excited me so much, I chose to study Plant Genetics. To learn that plants communicate when they're either stressed or happy. Yes, plants have feelings too - we just have a hard time understanding them - in many ways plants are alien creatures.

They live, act yes, they act , and reproduce in ways very strange to mammals. If you think plants are boring and totally uninteresting like my college zoology instructor , give this book a try.

You'll be surprised at the atypical This book is what really excited me so much, I chose to study Plant Genetics. You'll be surprised at the atypical research presented in this book. May 24, Jenell rated it really liked it Shelves: In The Secret Life of Plants: A fascinating account of the physical, emotional, and spiritual relations between plants and man, Peter Tompkins chronicles numerous scientists and their experiments with plants through the centuries.

I found myself immediately drawn in. The experiments were simple enough that I could do them. It is often these very people whose ideas are too strange or too powerful or too ahead of their time to be accepted. While their work was deemed pseudo-science or quackery, many scientists continued independently, documenting their work and self-publishing--which sometimes led to re-discovery and acceptance at a later time--sometimes long after they were dead.

It is when people start getting invested in science that I get skeptical. Researchers get funded by companies eager to find applications for consumers. Maybe there are applications in medicine--or, if not--maybe the Military-industrial complex.

My only criticism of the book is that, at some point I started to feel overwhelmed. I think it was due, in part, to poor organization. The Parts were divided into: I think, maybe, it would have had a better flow if it had been written chronologically--to chronicle the discoveries and subversion even in our own century and re-discoveries through the ages.

That way the reader could stop at each chapter and do supplemental reading--or perform their own experimentation--without having to wade through the 17 page Bibliography. Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Jagadis Chandra Bose, Rudolf Steiner, Wilhelm Reich, Luther Burbank… I also felt a call to the scientist in me--and a deep wish to share that we can all be engaged in our world in this scientific sense.

That we think we need to have the newest technology and be in the most credible clubs, is an artifice that prevents people--scientists and laypeople alike--from looking at their world with their very real curiosity and wonder.

The Secret Life of Plants inspired me to look further into the world that I inhabit and to take back science from the specialist dictocrats! Mar 07, Emily rated it it was amazing. This book is life-changing. Study after study, experiment after experiment - this book is full of the indisputable evidence that plants are sentient and possibly communicate with other worlds.

While the reading can be a bit heady, it covers such a fascinating topic so broadly, it doesn't matter. Artists, scientists, and students all have contributed to incredible work with plants to reveal just how alive they are.

H This book is life-changing. Highly recommend. Dec 14, Meadow rated it liked it. This non-fiction book discussed totally ridiculous, yet amazing research from the 70s regarding the empathetic and telekinetic powers of plant life.

Dec 25, Eliot Fiend rated it did not like it. Jan 24, Diane rated it did not like it Shelves: It is kind of hard to stomach. Not a science book. The claims that are made from the experimental evidence described here are in the realm of pseudoscience.

They dont follow guidelines of science. I started it but I probably will not finish it. It has an annoying chauvanistic undertone which begins in the introduction, when a general statement is made about women liking to decorate their houses with plants. Then they have to point out when a person is a female, and then they talk about brine shr It is kind of hard to stomach.

Then they have to point out when a person is a female, and then they talk about brine shrimp with a wink-wink suggestion that to know if brine shrimp are healthy, that is when the males try to mount the females. I dont know if it is true, but I have seen a number of brine shrimp, and I would like to know how they know which are males and which are females just by looking at them swim around. Sexism is annoying and helps to invalidate their claim to "science" as far as I am concerned.

Apr 02, Ron Campbell rated it really liked it Shelves: This is an older book that I think was published in the 70s, if I remember correctly. I include it under the bookshelf of shamanism because it explores the level of Consciousness within the Plant Kingdom.

The authors set many different environments for the plants and recorded how the plants responded. It goes to how plants develop relationships with their environment and even with animals and people. Our human senses are very limiting and just because plants may not respond in a manner that we ca This is an older book that I think was published in the 70s, if I remember correctly. Our human senses are very limiting and just because plants may not respond in a manner that we can easily observe does not mean that they do not respond.

Plant Consciousness is just different than ours!

Feb 05, Tania Ahlfeldt rated it it was amazing. I came across this book by pure accident and was drawn into it in a way I cannot explain. On the one hand I felt a salivating fascination and on the other it made me want to laugh hysterically at the absurdity of it.

That being said, I felt almost comforted by the unsophisticated 70's vibe of the book. Plants are way more intriguing to me now. I watch my sugar snap peas send out their tendrils which then search for and curl I came across this book by pure accident and was drawn into it in a way I cannot explain. I watch my sugar snap peas send out their tendrils which then search for and curl around the wire I strung up and I recognise that the plant is a living thing. But then, I do pop a fresh crunchy pod into my mouth.

Sorry plant Cleve Backster invented the Galvonometer otherwise known as the first "Lie Detector" before the advent of the polygraph being developed for use of studying the most fragile admissions of hopeful intelligent life and extra sensory perception with plants.

The book proves that since and the dawn of Botanical research Backster and his research of all species of plants are entirely sensitive to any mirroring human emotion. Later engineers had touched upon Backsters creation to make yet even mor Cleve Backster invented the Galvonometer otherwise known as the first "Lie Detector" before the advent of the polygraph being developed for use of studying the most fragile admissions of hopeful intelligent life and extra sensory perception with plants.

Later engineers had touched upon Backsters creation to make yet even more sensitive instruments for more acute research into exploring the depths of the sensory perception;extra to Humans- that would lay within all plant life.

The following Scientists to follow Backster have served to prove such things.

Plants are psychic,they all-ways know what your thinking; even from miles away, and they love music and water. A very revealing book. Jan 31, Courtney rated it liked it. Contains some nonsense in part due to the book being so old , as well as some wisdom, so pick and choose what chapters you would most like and then skip the rest. I appreciated the admirable account of George Washington Carver, noble genius, and also liked the idea that people should approach eating plants with a feeling of reverence.

After all, plants are living things that die in order for us humans to live. I found my prayers over meals became more thoughtful as I considered the soil, air, sunlight and water that had all gone into the material I now consume.

Sep 01, Ero rated it really liked it Shelves: Reading this book makes me feel stoned. In a good way. A lot of sentient root-tubules seeking sunlight, and responding via ESP. Hard to tell if there's any science buried in all the pseudo-science, but it seems likely. In any case the more far-fetched stuff is I can't read this on my way to work, it'll ruin my ability to focus.

But it's a great weekend read I love it. View 1 comment. Dec 22, Charlie rated it it was amazing Shelves: Some might say this book is airy fairy la la hippy crap. Personally I like the thought that plants are sentient in ways people don't fully understand.

Science and evolution are clearly valid explanations, but there is much left unexplained and its prudent to keep ones mind open to other more ethereal possibilities. Nov 23, Tony rated it really liked it. Some very convincing stuff here, but then they blew it near the end, by going over the top somewhat. View 2 comments. May 26, Scott rated it it was amazing.

Hall, Rudolf Steiner, and Thomas Edison. This book begins with Cleve Backster, America's foremost lie-detector examiner, connecting his galvanometer to a house plant called Dracaena massangeana.

He tried applying various stimuli to illicit a response from the plant to avail, until the moment when he thought about burning the plant with an open flame and then there was a dramatic change in the tracing pattern on the graph. I was fascinated with the experiments in this book and a little skeptical so you can imagine how pleased I was to find a documentary of the same name from which actually showed many of these experiments being reproduced.

So much of it seemed incredible but seeing is believing. The final portion of the book covered nutrition and soil fertility. Here are some highlights from book: Sir Jagadis Chandra Bose was able to demonstrate visually that all the characteristics of the responses exhibited by animal tissues we also found in those of plants.

He also found that plants became intoxicated when given shots of whiskey or gin, swayed like any barroom drunkard, passed out, and eventually revived, with definite signs of a hangover. These findings together with hundreds of other data were published in two massive volumes in and George Washington Carver's students were greatly impressed that each morning he would rise at four 0' clock to walk in the woods before the start of the working day and bring back countless plants with which to illustrate his lectures.

Explaining this habit to friends, Carver said, "Nature is the greatest teacher and I learn from her best when others are asleep. In the still dark hours before sunrise God tells me of the plans I am to fulfill. George E. Smith continuously broadcast music to a small plot of Embro 44XE hybrid corn from the day of its planting to harvest time. The plot produced bushels to the acre as against only bushels for an untreated plot of similar corn growing under the same conditions.

Smith noted that the musically entertained corn also grew more rapidly and uniformly and silked earlier. The larger yield per acre was due not to an increase per plant but to a greater survival of plants in the plot. To make sure that his tests were not due to chance, Smith laid out four corn plots in planted not only with the same Embro 44XE but also with another highly prolific hybrid, Embro Departure. The first plot was treated to the previous year's music, the second left silent, and the third and fourth offered only ear-splitting continuous notes, one with a high pitch of 1, cycles a second, the other with a low pitch of At harvest time the Departure plants stimulated with music produced bushels per acre as against only for the silent plot.

But those exposed to the high note outdid themselves to achieve nearly bushels; those subjected to the low note topped Selim Lemstrom, made four expeditions to the subpolar regions o Spitsbergen, northern Norway, and Lapland from to An expert on polar light and earth magnetism, Lemstrom theorized that the luxuriant vegetation in those latitudes, which popular opinion ascribe to the lengthened days of their summers, was actually attributable to what he called "that violent electrical manifestation, the aurora borealis.

Lemstrom connected a series of flowers in metal pots to a static generator by an overhead network of wires sixteen inches above them and a pole set into the soil as a ground.

Other pots he "left to nature. When he transferred his apparatus into a garden he not only more than doubled the yield of strawberries but found them to be much sweeter; his harvest from barley plants increased by one-third.

In his L 'Origine de la Vie, published in , Georges Lakhovsky set forth a number of startling experiments upholding the idea that disease is a matter of disequilibrium in cellular oscillation, that the fight between healthy cells and pathogens, such as bacteria or viruses, is a "war of radiations. When the plants had developed tumors the size of cherry stones, one of them was exposed to radiation from the oscillator.

During the first days the tumor grew rapidly, but after two weeks it suddenly began to shrink and die; after a second two-week period it fell off the afflicted plant. Other geraniums treated over different time periods also shed their cancers under the effect of oscillator radiations. Joe Nichols, a physician and surgeon who founded the Natural Food Associates in Atlanta, Texas, reported that a survey on farms throughout the Middle West disclosed that the corn growth was so heavily fertilized with synthetic nitrogen that it was unable to convert carotene into vitamin A and that the cattle feed produced from it was also deficient in vitamins D and E.

In modern processed foods the vitamins, trace elements, and enzymes are arbitrarily removed, mostly so as to render the food more durable.

The Secret Life of Plants

As Nichols puts it, "They remove the life, in effect, killing it, so that it will not live and die later. Wheat germ is one of a very few places in nature in which the entire vitamin B complex is found In so-called "enriched" white bread, with the vitamins and minerals removed, nothing is left but raw starch, which has so little nutritive value that most bacteria won't eat it.

Into this insipid starch synthetic chemicals are arbitrarily injected, which form only part of the missing vitamin B complex. Men from northern England and southern Scotland, large and powerful during the Napoleonic Wars, became short and frail and unfit for military service by the time of the Boer War.He also found that plants became intoxicated when given shots of whiskey or gin, swayed like any barroom drunkard, passed out, and eventually revived, with definite signs of a hangover.

It is a sort of survey historical research scientific and otherwise about all facets of plant-ness. Or at least I thought so.

Unfortunately, research in this area is often discouraged because it's labeled "unscientific". In modern processed foods the vitamins, trace elements, and enzymes are arbitrarily removed, mostly so as to render the food more durable. Organic farming is better than petroleum-based agriculture, for the farm, the earth, and the eventual eater of the stuff, regardless of the propaganda from agri-business.

Who knew plants were capable of emotion and connection to human beings? Amazon Inspire Digital Educational Resources.