resourceone.info Environment In Real Life Book

IN REAL LIFE BOOK

Saturday, May 4, 2019


Start by marking “In Real Life” as Want to Read: Anda loves Coarsegold Online, the massively-multiplayer role-playing game where she spends most of her free time. A good read for gamers and lovers of graphic novels!. resourceone.info: In Real Life (): Cory Doctorow, Jen Wang: Books. Fun graphic novel about gamers makes strong political point. Parents need to know that In Real Life, written by Cory Doctorow and illustrated by Jen Wang, is a graphic novel about a teen girl gamer who learns lessons about working conditions in other parts of the world.


In Real Life Book

Author:CATRICE OBERBECK
Language:English, Spanish, Arabic
Country:Germany
Genre:Business & Career
Pages:412
Published (Last):15.10.2015
ISBN:640-1-27362-997-6
ePub File Size:24.56 MB
PDF File Size:10.57 MB
Distribution:Free* [*Regsitration Required]
Downloads:34701
Uploaded by: SUSY

BUY THE BOOK “Online gaming and real life collide when a teen discovers the hidden economies and injustices that hide among seemingly innocent pixels. Anda agrees, and in the book's most disturbing scene, finds the gold But “In Real Life” is a powerful narrative nonetheless, and it's easy to. In Real Life by Joey Graceffa - A confessional, uplifting memoir from the beloved YouTube resourceone.info's not where you begin that matters. It's where you end.

It was cute, fun, and light. It is a nice break between heavier reads. I would recommend it to any video game fans or anyone who is looking to get into graphic novels and wants something light to start out with. This review was originally posted on Thoughts on Tomes Aug 16, Sam Quixote rated it really liked it. And then she meets Raymond, a player her age from China, and her world, online and offline, changes.

On the flip-side, it shows Chinese kids ways they could possibly achieve a better life. Though maybe the intent is to foster optimism and the possibilities of change in the reader rather than allow reality a too dominant presence. After all, reality can be - and has been - changed many times before, so why not now?

And the book ends sweetly, celebrating the simple similarities children the world over share: Like a lot of First Second comics In Real Life is aimed at the high school crowd but as a grown-up in theory , I still really enjoyed this. I applaud Doctorow for writing an engaging story with a strong positive political spirit. In Real Life has a heart and a brain - recommended to all fans of quality comics! If you're a gamer, you definitely have to check out In Real Life, but I think it would be a great read for people with no gaming experience, too!

While it does take place partially within the game, and involves a lot of MMORPG action, there's not a lot of "insider" jargon to ruin the experience for someone who hasn't played a game like 'Coarsegold Online' before. At its core, it's more of a story about learning to recognize our privileges and empathize with people who have it worse off than us, If you're a gamer, you definitely have to check out In Real Life, but I think it would be a great read for people with no gaming experience, too!

At its core, it's more of a story about learning to recognize our privileges and empathize with people who have it worse off than us, as well as recognizing bullying and how to stand up and fight it.

There's also some lovely diverse rep in this graphic novel, with a fat protagonist and some great POC rep scattered throughout. I highly recommend giving In Real Life a try if you enjoy contemporary graphic novels or stories about gamers and video games!

Oct 16, First Second Books marked it as first-second-publications. With all the kerfuffle going on in gaming circles right now about the inclusion of women in video games, I'm so glad that Cory and Jen have created this book with a girl main character who loves and plays video games. More than that, I'm glad that this is a story where the fact that Anda is a girl never comes into question. Of course she's a girl. Of course she loves video games. Of course they're important to her in both her online and offline lives, and influence how she thinks about life in ge With all the kerfuffle going on in gaming circles right now about the inclusion of women in video games, I'm so glad that Cory and Jen have created this book with a girl main character who loves and plays video games.

Of course they're important to her in both her online and offline lives, and influence how she thinks about life in general. Yay that! Nov 21, Sesana rated it liked it Shelves: I probably should have liked this more than I actually did. I am a gamer, even if I don't play MMOs. I do appreciate Doctorow for pointing out how intimidating it can be to be female online.

But that's basically abandoned as a storyline almost immediately. I'm happy he addressed it though it's obviously much safer for him, as a man, to mention the issue than it would be for a woman but it's just kind of mentioned once or twice then forgotten about.

The book isn't about that, but I sort of wish I probably should have liked this more than I actually did. The book isn't about that, but I sort of wish it was. Instead, it's about gold farming.

These gold farmers are downtrodden Chinese sweatshop gold farmers. Who need a teenage, white, American girl to inspire them to unionize. Through an online translator.

That did kind of rub me the wrong way.

We never really get to see all that much of any of the Chinese characters, which was another disappointment. But Anda herself is such a genuine, nice girl, and a joy to read about. Better yet, her parents are loving, supportive, and engaged in her life. I get so sick of absentee parents in YA, and it's nice to see good parents who are trying and who have children who respect them.

This is a very quick read, and it goes down easily. The characters are appealing, and Doctorow's heart is in the right place.

I think he could have done better, but he did pretty good. Nov 05, Kate GirlReading rated it really liked it. It's beautifully drawn and the colours are gorgeous. It's definitely one of the prettiest, most aesthetically pleasing graphic novels I've read. I also really liked the fact that Anda wasn't the classic, model figured character I've often seen in graphic novels. It was nice that the characters were all different shapes and sizes!

I enjoyed the feminist aspect to it, although I do wish that had been a little more prominent as I felt it w 3. I enjoyed the feminist aspect to it, although I do wish that had been a little more prominent as I felt it was a bit lost after the beginning!

In Real Life had a really interesting, underlying message on social issues. It wasn't what I was expecting at all but not in a negative way! Although I did feel as though the story wasn't fleshed out quite enough, everything seemed to happen a little too quickly and conveniently! I think I may have possibly enjoyed this a little more if I were a gamer, as know nothing about that world or culture but it was really interesting to read about!

Dec 23, Jessica rated it really liked it. Really enjoyed this!! Jul 02, Lisa rated it it was ok Shelves: Teenage Anda is a girl gamer who gets caught up in Coarsegold, her favorite MMO, where she feels invincible, powerful, and wanted — until she meets Raymond, a poor Chinese teen who also loves Corasegold, and discovers things are not all that they seem.

Raymond, it turns out, works illegally within the game to make money on the outside to survive.

Lines between right and wrong get blurred pretty quick while Anda balan A digital ARC was provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Lines between right and wrong get blurred pretty quick while Anda balances what she thinks can be done and what the reality actually is. The graphic novel is supposed to address class, ethnicity, and gender struggles within a page format and do it well.

It fails. Horribly, horribly fails. You need to make up your mind. Now I have questions: Why is Liza the Organiza invited to speak to a high school class? Since when do MMO organizers go to classrooms to recruit players? Especially ones under age who do no thave access to credit card accounts to pay for such things. I guess? The Liza the Organiza starts her organizing — she wants to know how many of the girls in the class game and then how many of them game as girls?

Which of course, none of the aforementioned girls who raised their hands in admittance of gaming, raise their hands to admit they game as girls. We already know the long, long history of what happens to girls who game as themselves in the gaming world. So Liza the Organiza puts to them a special deal: Are you joking?

And this ends the entirety of the discussion of women in gaming and gender disparity in the gaming world in In Real Life. Between the front matter, Mr. Anda gets into the game, gets bedazzled by the popularity she receives within the MMO world and then meets Raymond.

The storyline limps along, dragging the reader to point out white people should stop being saviors to all the other non-white folk because you know, we keep fucking their world up. The ending, with all the faux tension being built, was kind of anticlimactic. Like, yay? And oh yeah, Liza reappears again for some strange reason to grant her approval on how things turned out. Liza, you were a pointless character.

You should have been axed. Does our heroine just log into the game in the privacy of the laundry room? I mean, honestly? How the fuck do you think video chats work? Through ESP? This is a big graff — how could this have been missed through the editing process? And the avatars of the Asians they are sent out to kill are all drawn like stereotypes of Asian farm workers. How can a book that is supposed to capture essence of teens yet sound like it written by a 40 year old man who is far on the wrong side of teenage years?

If anything, at least the book is pretty to look at. Apr 08, Puck rated it liked it Shelves: Eeh, this was alright. Enjoyable but not memorable. I liked the art style the most. The colors were bright and vivid and worked really well in making the digital world feel energized and alive. The fighting scenes especially stood out by their power and the dynamic movements of the characters.

Wang did a great job at designing the diverse fantasy world of Coarsegold, and if it was real, I'd love to join the game community. The plot however wasn't nearly as creative as the digital world o 3 stars. The plot however wasn't nearly as creative as the digital world of Coarsegold Online. Most of the characters fell flat for me expect Anda and certain events were pretty predicable.

I felt like Doctorow should have taken more time to work the story out properly, because the topics that are discussed in this novel are important and based on real-life problems. Now things with Raymond were wrapped up so quickly that you never got the time to really think about those problems, which is damaging and kind of disrespectful. Still, the feminist aspect of this story is a good one, and all the different female gamers are wonderful in their own way.

In the end games are supposed to bring people together because everyone loves to play, and Doctorow and Wang succeeded in getting that positive message across. I'm happy to have this graphic novel in my collection, and I'd love to check out more of Wang's work in the future. Jul 29, Lotte rated it liked it Shelves: The good part is that this got me reading after I've been in a reading slump during the last couple of weeks. The not-so-good part is that the story was, well The art was rather mediocre in my opinion and the plot just lacked something.

While I've loved every graphic novel I've read so far, this was the first one that didn't really grab or excite me. Oct 17, Lily rated it did not like it Shelves: Please tell me I'm not the only one who found this graphic novel incredibly problematic? My biggest problem with In Real Life is the way it portrays social class. Dichotomies between classes is rarely discussed in literature geared toward younger audiences.

I was ecstatic when I thought I finally found a book to dive into these issues. But after having read it, I have to say that I think this graphic novel failed miserably at the task. It was so frustrating to see that the social problems facing Please tell me I'm not the only one who found this graphic novel incredibly problematic?

It was so frustrating to see that the social problems facing the Chinese workers were used as nothing more than plot devices conveniently placed to allow for the main character's personal grow.

What was equally irritating was that readers were not even given the opportunity to explore these issues further or to witness the lives of the workers beyond their poorly depicted living circumstances. I would not have had such a problem with the depiction of social class if I didn't believe the book actually sent the wrong message to readers.

It highlights numerous complex and important issues and then decides they can all be solved by the generic advice of a teenage girl?

"If this isn't bravery, we don't know what is."

The idea that anyone in the first world - even a teenager with a love for video games - can possibly solve problems originating within a world and culture she barely understands is ridiculous at best. There were many aspects of this graphic novel that I completely adored. I loved the fact that our main character was Latina and I loved the feminist message the book sent.

But the fact that there is such a strong emphasis placed upon social class and the way it is so poorly depicted is unacceptable in my eyes, even given the author's good intentions.

I cannot say I'd recommend picking this one up. It was disappointing, to say the least. Sep 11, Ferdy rated it it was ok Shelves: Spoilers Loved the artwork, wasn't as impressed by the rest. Found the characters really flat and the most of the story quite dull and predictable, the gaming aspect when the characters actually entered the video game was quite fun though. Was more interested in Raymond's life and the problems he faced in his workplace in China than Anda's first world problems and second hand angst.

Kind of hated the end where the complicated issues Raymond and other players like him faced were solved in the m Spoilers Loved the artwork, wasn't as impressed by the rest. Kind of hated the end where the complicated issues Raymond and other players like him faced were solved in the most cheesiest way possible, it was so unrealistic how everything worked out so perfectly for them, there were no consequences or backlash to their demands.

The worst aspect though was the whole white savior complex, with Anda being outraged and crusading for justice and all the Chinese players needing generic advice from her to stand up to their boss for some reason they couldn't do anything without her. It was irritating as the help Anda gave was so simple and something they could have easily come up with themselves. Did enjoy the focus on gamer girls, but that didn't make up for the rubbish aspects. Feb 12, Mario rated it it was amazing Shelves: This is such a good graphic novel.

Parents say

I really enjoyed it. Wish it was longer, though. Oct 22, Erica rated it liked it Shelves: This is pretty cute! There are some great things in this book: She's chunky with brown hair and not-white skin.

She could represent pretty much any non-standard teenage female, especially any gamer girl in that she's not the petite, blonde cheerleader type which isn't to say petite, blonde cheerleaders don't play video games; I'm sure plenty of them do but that look is not the stereotype for girls who are geeks and this story is not about busting cheerleader stereotype This is pretty cute! She could represent pretty much any non-standard teenage female, especially any gamer girl in that she's not the petite, blonde cheerleader type which isn't to say petite, blonde cheerleaders don't play video games; I'm sure plenty of them do but that look is not the stereotype for girls who are geeks and this story is not about busting cheerleader stereotypes 2 Anda has two parents and no Terrible Thing happening in her household.

Her parents are concerned that she plays online games but they support her in her endeavors as long as she plays responsibly. Anda doesn't freak out and go on a murder spree or turn into a vampire, she sulks and deals with it. I liked that.

The character creator comes with an option to choose your outfit! I like to pretend that it's like choosing your style so that every time wearable armor drops, it will turn into Your Style once you equip it!

So if your style is punk and you pick up a chest plate and put it on, you have a punked out chest plate. However, if your friend is AsianFusion and puts on the same chest plate, her chest plate looks AsianFusion! How cool would that be? I would totally love that. It's just something I saw and got excited over after letting my imagination run away with me.

There are at least three girls in the programming class and the guys in class don't seem to have a problem with there being girls learning to program. The students just treat each other as students Though, the Geek Squad does get all uppity at lunchtime when a preppy girl tries to bridge their social cultures so there's still inequality that needs to be addressed, but that comes later.

There are also some things that left a frown on my face. Spelled out , it seems that perhaps a reader unfamiliar with games, in general, and MMORPGs in particular, might be confused by a lot of what goes on in this story. To me, that means that this is aimed at a gaming audience, specifically girls who may feel alienated by their gaming peers, and not at the general populace. There's no doubt that gamer girls need to see representation in entertainment just as much as any non-white, non-middle-to-upper-class, non-gender-normative, non-perfectly-able-in-every-way, marginalized individual needs to see representation but it is just as true that the rest of us white, middle-to-upper class, CIS, able-in-every-way, non-marginilized viewers and readers also need to see everyone else being represented so that we maybe stop thinking we're the center of the world no, I know we don't think we're the center of the world.

Well, maybe some of us do. Ok, I am totally the center of my world. But you know what I mean Preaching to the choir doesn't really help fix issues among the people wandering around outside the church, ya know?

My long-winded point being: This is a fantastic, uplifting story for young gamers, especially girls, but it may not do much for anyone else so will not be able to help bridge communication, empathy, other noble feelings and actions between said gamers and those who don't understand the whole gamer community or, more importantly, the female gamer community.

What a diatribe! Apparently, this is something I feel strongly about. I didn't know. And I don't have any suggestions as how this could have been more user-friendly to non-gamers. I just know that my sister couldn't read this and appreciate it even though she has a daughter like Anda. It would bore her to tears except for the parts with the parents. She'd like those parts 2 This part is totally just me going nutso, but, I was a bit weirded-out that the two main female avatars are running around with pink knees.

I know that giving pink knees to illustrated children is a thing but this seemed a bit derogatory. I KNOW it wasn't meant to be but, man, it bugged me. To be fair, there aren't a lot of other bare knees with which to compare and when there are other instances of other female avatar knees being pink, they're not consistent.

We don't get to see if male avatar knees are pink. Again, this is me jumping to crazyass conclusions and I know that but I still wanted to point out that the damned pink knees bothered the hell out of me.

Analee, in Real Life

I didn't think it a was a cute, rough-n-tumble kid representation; I read sinister undertones that probably weren't there because I was looking at this with way too critical an eye. So this must be a real thing? I mean, gold farmers are a real thing and that they can mess up a gaming system is a real thing. At the very least, they allow for people with money to buy power, unbalancing what would be the natural flow of the game.

However, IRL, people with money buy power, don't they?

It's good to know that gold farmers are people, too, and work in sweatshops and their lives suck. I don't understand how killing these farmers is worth real-time money, though, especially when they can just res and keep going. If you can't steal player loot, then there's no point killing the farmer, right?

I thought that had gone out the window eons ago?

Just an FYI: I carry my grudges long and hard. Anyway, that made me tilt my head and go, "Huh? You can loot player corpses? When did this start happening again?

I want my cloak back, you asshole! Unless you were friends first, outside the game, you don't call each other by your real names ingame!

You call each other by your game names.

In Real Life

And then you usually become friends with your guildmates and you still call them by their gamenames even when you're not ingame and in Anda's friends at school. Here's why: Girls have relationships, even geeky gamer girls.

It would be nice to see that represented in a positive light, for a change. So many J and YA stories for girls highlight toxic relationships. Why not show the value of a solid, good friendship? But in order to do that, you've got to give characters depth, show the connections between them, and all that other writerly stuff. This is getting ridiculous and long.

Why do I have so much to say about this book? I think it's because I wish I would have had something like it when I was a young woman. Ok, when I was in college. Though, I probably wouldn't have liked this in college because, at that time, I tried to be highbrow and snotty. I read a lot of Chaucer. I wouldn't have been reading graphic novels. I totally abandoned comics except Sandman during that time. And I'm not even done with my expoundary!

Here are some things I noticed in general. Online looks pretty awesome, actually.

It's got a lot of stuff going on - specialized housing, buyable land apparently , the ability to play invisible Anda ditches Lucy, saying she has to go to dinner, but just goes somewhere else ingame and Lucy doesn't say, "Um, I see you're still online, dumbass. I thought you were going to dinner" Dude, I'm going to shut up now. I've rambled for far too long over this.

Main point: I liked it, it's cute. I'd have personally liked it to be stronger in areas. January Read: In Real Life 2 15 Jan 25, Optional Book Club Discussion: Write a customer review. Showing of 14 reviews. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews.

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Kindle Edition Verified Purchase. I finally had a respite from grading final exams and spent a few hours reading In Real Life. The latest craze is League of Legends, which is apparently incredibly addicting. Unfortunately, many of my students will sleep only one or two hours a night because of their gaming time; therefore, their school work suffers and they look like hell.

Yes, on the surface, the story revolves around a young man immersed in the world of professional gaming; however, more importantly, this novel addresses issues faced by many teens: Instead, Tabak creates a likable protagonist, a shy, respectful, gifted young man who handles not only the tumultuous teen years but also an incredibly difficult situation with grace and humility.

Well done! One person found this helpful. A well thought out and engaging story of the anxiety of youth through the eyes of a video gamer. I enjoyed the behind the scenes look at the life of someone who has the desire and ability to make it in the world of professional gaming.

Not a subject that I've seen explored before in a youth fiction format. If you have every been a gamer, are a gamer, lived with or know a gamer this is an insightful read. I thought it was a great book. It was very relatable and exciting and addicting all at the same time. Good job Lawrence Tabak!

In Real Life was about a teen named Seth, a gifted math student, who was also gifted at playing an online game Starfare in the book, based on Starcraft in real life. Seth was one of the best players in the US, and eventually one of the Korean professional teams recruits him. While this book was fiction, the author had two sons play in pro eGames, so it felt very, very realistic and accurate.

Even though I'm a gamer, going into this book I thought I might not enjoy it. These professional eGamers, I just don't get them. It always seemed a little silly to me to try to make a videogame into a sport. But wow, this book showed me how serious places like Korea take it. Plus I got an interesting view of Korea from an outsider's perspective, and a look at some interesting math stuff, and other new-to-me things.

Unfortunately I didn't enjoy the subplot Seth's relationship with his girlfriend. It was realistic and believable, but I just don't generally like romance in my storylines. I was worried at how the story would end, because there was only one way I could see it concluding.

I don't want to spoil anything, but I was really, really worried the author would put down gamers -- that he would end the book with Seth deciding his life was better without gaming.

But luckily that wasn't the case. The ending felt like the author was being both true to the story and respectful to gamers. Even with the romance subplot, I really enjoyed this book. It's very, very rare for me want to reread a book my To Read Pile is way too big for rereading , but I would happily reread this one.

Kindle Edition.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Net Galley in exchange for an honest review. I am so glad I got a chance to read this book! Sixteen year old Seth is given the opportunity to go pro in the Korean gaming world. They make him a celebrity, but his isolation and his relationship with a girl back home in Kansas have him thinking hard about what he truly wants to do with his life. Don't ignore this book because it is about gaming -- it was easy to follow and even interesting to read about in this context.

Don't ignore this book because it is a male protagonist -- this character is appealing to both male and female readers. Seth reads as a genuine teen, and there is a depth to his growth that is very engaging. This is a Bildungsroman, so the real goal in this book is to see the character grow and mature as a human.

While there is some action in this story, there is a lot of thinking, too, so don't expect the book to read like a video game.

I gave this book five stars, not because I thought it was perfect, because it wasn't, but it had soul and depth to it, something that is often found in ya books with female protagonists, but is more elusive in ya books with male protagonists. The topic will draw my high school boys to the book, and I think they will stick with it because it is genuinely good. Interest level is high school and beyond.

I will add it to my classroom library wish list and recommend it to our school librarian. See all 14 reviews. Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway. This item: In Real Life.

Set up a giveaway. There's a problem loading this menu right now. Learn more about Amazon Prime. Get fast, free shipping with Amazon Prime.

Back to top. Get to Know Us.Warning, spoilery stuff ahead if you should care to read this book. Top Reviews Most recent Top Reviews. Read reviews that mention real life best friend analee in real high school never met janelle milanes highly recommend met in person well written felt like boys i loved character development named harris loved this book book a great story about analee analee is much seb online knows.

Great Book, love this Author!! There is none such in this book. Set in Sin City, we're taking on an sweet and sometimes angsty ride, as the two online best friends work out what their friendship means.