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AMERICAN HEADWAY STARTER TEACHERS BOOK

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American Headway Starter Teacher's Book (including Tests) by John Soars, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. American Headway Second Edition Starter Teacher's Book & Test includes progress tests, answer keys for the Student Book and Workbook, and an access code. American Headway is the course you can always trust. Its proven methodology - focus on grammar, clear vocabulary syllabus, integrated skills work - was.


American Headway Starter Teachers Book

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American Headway Starter: Teacher's Book. Liz Soars, John Soars and Amanda Maris () Oxford: Oxford University Press Pp. xiii + American Headway - Teacher's Book PDF - Ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or If you are about to start Unit 1 of American Headway Starter;. How does American Headway deliver lessons that really do work in class? American Headway Starter First Edition Full Set - полный комплект уровень.

American Headway: Level 2: Add to basket. Student Pack A John Soars. Level 3: Level 4: Workbook A John Soars. Workbook A Joan Soars. Level 1: Workbook Liz Soars. Level 5: Workbook John Soars. Teacher's Pack John Soars. Then have students write other questions using What…? Monitor and help as necessary. Students ask and answer in closed pairs. Answers She Is a teacher.

He Is a doctor. They are from Canada. This listening activity has Claude and Holly talking about different aspects of their trip to New York. It introduces basic adjectives and words related to visiting cities, e. CD1 — 26 Play the recording through once, and have students complete the conversations.

Play it again so that students can check their answers. If necessary, play it a third time to let students listen and repeat. Encourage accurate pronunciation and a wide voice range on the sentences with the adjectives.

Students practice the conversations in pairs. If possible, have students stand up and role-play the characters, as this often helps with pronunciation and overall delivery. What's this building? It's the Empire State Building! Oh, no! Look at the weather! It's awful! Look at my hamburger! My hamburger is really good, too! Look at Central Park! It's beautiful!

Have them substitute key words from the conversations with their own examples. They then role-play the conversations. Have the rest of the class guess where they are. Where are they? Ask students to say numbers around the class, repeating as many times as necessary until students can say them without hesitation. CD1 — 27 Focus attention on numbers Play the recording, and have students listen, read, and repeat chorally.

Play the recording again, and have students repeat individually. If necessary, remind students that the gh in eighteen is silent by writing the word on the board and crossing out the letters.

Ask students to say numbers around the class. Again, have them repeat as many times as necessary until they can say the numbers without hesitation. Give students a number dictation.

See Unit 1 Suggestion TB p. Then write a random selection of numbers as figures on the board, and have students say the numbers first chorally and then individually. Focus attention on the example. Then have students continue matching in pairs.

CD1 — 28 Play the recording through once, and have students check their answers. Play the recording again, and have them repeat, first chorally and then individually. Check that students can distinguish the word stress on thirteen and thirty: Have them repeat as many times as necessary until they can say the numbers without hesitation. CD1 — 29 Focus attention on the rows of numbers in Exercise 5. Play the first number as an example, and focus on the answer Let students check their answers in pairs, and then play the recording again if necessary.

Student A should say the numbers and Student B should write them. Then have students change roles. Monitor and check for accurate pronunciation and comprehension of the numbers. Note any common errors, and drill and practice the numbers again in the next class. This activity allows students to consolidate numbers through a guessing game based on peoples age. Focus attention on the first photo, and drill the examples in the speech bubbles.

Pre-teach Yes, I agree to give students an alternative answer. Elicit students ideas of the girls age in the first photo. Students continue talking about the age of the people in the photos, working in pairs or groups of three.

Students will go on to practice more personal information questions in Unit 3. Elicit a range of answers from the class in a short discussion. Ask them to learn the words for homework, and test them on a few in the following class. Unit 3: Jobs - Personal information Everyday English: This includes job, age, address, phone number, and whether they are married or not. The lexical set of jobs is presented, and the Everyday English syllabus is extended to include social expressions.

Vocabulary A set of common jobs is presented, and there is an opportunity to extend this set with students own jobs. Workbook The lexical set of jobs is recycled. The forms of to be are fully reviewed with exercises on negative forms, questions, and short answers. Students are given extra practice in listening and reading, and there is an exercise consolidating vocabulary from the unit.

The social expressions from Everyday English are also reviewed.

American Headway Starter Teacher's Book (including Tests)

NOTE In this section, students are asked to give their own job. Briefly check the pronunciation with the students so that they are prepared for Starter Exercise 3. Students will already be familiar with doctor and teacher from the Reading in Unit 2, so use these as examples to demonstrate the activity. If you think students might know some of the jobs, put thenl in pairs and ask them to match any jobs they know and guess the others. Then check answers with the class.

Concentrate on correct pronunciation and word stress. Read the questions and answers with the class. Play the recording, pausing at the end of each line and having the students repeat chorally and individually. Make sure students include the article a each time. Students practice talking about the people in the pictures in open and then in closed pairs. Focus attention on the questions and answers in the speech bubbles. Write the sentences on the board and circle the a in each answer to emphasize that we use an article before jobs.

Drill the question and answers chorally and individually. Quickly check if students have jobs that are different from those in the Student Book. If students want to use a job beginning with a vowel, e. This is the first time students encounter the negative form and use the illustrations in this exercise to make the concept clear. Point to the first image and ask' Where are they? If appropriate, shake your head as you say the negative sentence to reinforce the meaning.

Point to the second image and ask Where are they? Elicit In a hospital. Again, shake your head as you say the negative sentence if appropriate. CD1 — 32 Play the recording, pausing at the end of each line and having the students repeat chorally and individually. Make sure students can reproduce the negative form correctly and that they include the article a each time.

Also check that they deliver the sentences fluently. If necessary, highlight the linking after the negative form: Write the following cues on the board to demonstrate the activitv: Students then continue talking about the pictures in closed pairs. Make sure students understand that the sentence is negative. Ask students to circle the negative forms in Exercises 1 and 2. You can talk about their jobs and also review the language from Unit 2, e.

This section covers the personal information that students may need to exchange in a range of everyday situations. The information about the character Erica is presented as a personal profile that might appear on a social networking site like Facebook or MySpace.

Focus attention on the photo of Erica and the information in her profile. Read through the information with the class. Remind students of married from the Reading in Unit 2. Focus attention on the example in Number 1. Put students into pairs to complete the questions and answers. This question should not be a problem for them as they have already practiced it several times.

Students encountered the question How old is he! Make sure they understand that this is the question to ask about age. It is given in full in Sentence 6 of the exercise so that students can familiarize themselves with it before they practice it.

Again, students will be able to generate the question Is she married? CD1 — 33 Play the recording, pausing after each question and answer, and have students check their answers. What's her last name? What's her first name? Where's she from? What's her address? What's her phone number? It's How old is she? She's twenty. What's her job? Is she married?

No, she isn't. Play the recording again, and have students repeat all the questions and answers. Do this chorally and individually. CD1 — 34 Focus attention on the questions and answers. Ask students to read and listen.

American Headway Second Edition Level 3

Check for accurate reproduction of the rising intonation on the question and falling intonation on the answer: Is Erica from England? Focus on the question cues in Number 1, and demonstrate the first question-and-answer exchange with a confident student - Is she from Montreal?

Students continue to ask and answer about the other cities in Question 1, working in open pairs. Students continue asking and answering the other questions in closed pairs. Monitor and check for correct intonation and correct use of short answers. Is she from Montreal? Yes, she Is. Is she from Toronto?

Is she 16? No, she Isn't. Is she 18? Is she 20? Is she a teacher? Is she a nurse? Yes, she is. Is she a student? This exercise practices affirmative and negative forms in statements. Focus attention on the two examples in Number 1. Students complete the sentences with the information about Erica.

Have students check their 'answers in pairs before checking with the whole class. Be prepared to review and drill numbers if students have problems saying the phone numbers. Focus attention on the picture. Ask Where are the people? Elicit In a studio. Draw a simple family tree on the board to pre-teach brother.

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Refer students back to the map on SB p. Also, point out the state of Vermont on a map of the United States. CD1 — 35 Play the recording through once, and ask students just to listen.

Play the recording again, and have students complete as many questions and answers as they can. Ask them to compare their answers in pairs and help each other to complete The Audition interview. Answers and audio script I: Is this your band, Metro 5? Yes, It is.

And are you Danny McNeil? This is Danny. Ah, yes, sorry. Hi, Danny. Oh, where are you from? We're from Vermont in the U. Are the other boys from Vermont, too? They're all from different countries. And are they all waiters? Yeah, I'm a bus driver and Ronan's a nurse and Bo and Edson are students. And Danny, are you the singer in the band? Yes, I am. Oh, right! Good luck to you all!

Thank you very much. This exercise asks basic comprehension questions about the band. Put students in pairs to ask and answer the rest of the questions. Monitor and check for accurate pronunciation and formation of the short answers. CD1 — 36 Play the recording through once, and have students check their answers.

If necessary, play it again and have students listen and repeat.

Then put them in new pairs to practice the questions and answers again. Metro 5. Are Paul and Danny brothers? Yes, they are. Are they from Canada? Are the other boys from Vermont? Are they all waiters? Are they all singers? Focus attention on the negative sentences and what the contracted forms are in full. Make sure students understand that the sentences are negative. Ask students to circle the negative forms in the interview in Exercise 2. Focus attention on the short answers. Ask students to circle the short answers in the interview in Exercise 2.

Read Grammar Reference 3. Put students in groups of three to practice the interview. Encourage the appropriate intonation on the questions and voice range on replies like Interesting, Oh, right, etc. Talking about you 5. Focus attention on the first question and the speech bubbles. Flave students ask and answer in open pairs.

Students work in small groups to continue the task. Alternatively, students could stand up and do the activity as a mingle. Monitor and check for correct intonation and use of short answers. Focus attention on the photos of Diego and Sarah. Ask Where are they? Elicit that Diego is by his taxi and Sarah is in a store.

Have students read through the information in the chart so that they know what they have to listen for. Explain that they are going to hear two conversations, one with Diego and one with Sarah. CD1 — 37 Ask students to listen for the city or town Diego is from. Play the first 7 lines of Conversation 1 and then pause. Check the answer Mexico City. Play the recording again from the beginning, and have students complete the information about Diego.

Pause before moving on to Conversation 2. Play Conversation 2 through once, and have students complete the information about Sarah. Have students compare their answers in pairs. Play the conversations again, pausing after Conversation 1.

CD1 — 37 1. Good morning. What's your name, please? And where are you from, Diego? I'm from Mexico, from Mexico City. And your telephone number, please? How old are you, Diego?

I'm forty-two. And… what's your job? And… are you married? No, I'm not. Good afternoon. Sarah, Sarah Cho. And where are you from? From New York. So you're from the United States, S: What's your phone number?

How old are you? I'm thirty-three. I'm a sales assistant. And are you married?

Demonstrate the activity by asking a confident student the first question. Students continue asking and answering in closed pairs. Monitor and check. If students have problems with intonation or with the short answers, drill the questions and answers across the class, and have students repeat.

Answers Is Diego from Mexico City? Yes, he is.

Is he a businessman? No, he isn't. Is he 42? Is he married? Is Sarah from the United States? Is she thirty-three?

Is Sarah from Chicago? Is he a teacher? Is he 23? Is her phone number ? Is she a sales assistant? This activity gives students the opportunity to practice he! Focus attention on the examples in the speech bubbles, and elicit complete sentences. Students continue talking about Diego and Sarah in closed pairs. Monitor and check for accurate use of the helshe forms. Tell students they need a question word, e. Have students complete the questions in pairs. Are you married?

Check the pronunciation of the questions. Make sure students know to use falling intonation on the Wh- questions and rising intonation on the Yes INo question Number 7. Divide the class into groups of three, and have students interview each other using the questions. Ask students to write down information about one student to use in Exercise 6.

This is the first writing task in the course. Ask students to use the information they found out in Exercise 5 to write a short description. This can be done during class time or for homework. As an extension, you could use the descriptions in a describe- and-guess game by not giving the students name each time. Students continue working individually to choose the correct sentences. His phone number is They aren't from Taiwan. It gives an update on the bands progress with a magazine article and a recorded interview.

The text also introduces the subject pronoun we and broadens students exposure to new lexical items. Focus attention on the photo, and make sure students understand it shows the same band as on SB p. Elicit any other information the students can remember. Point to the different band members in the photo, and introduce the question word Who? Other new vocabulary in the text includes boy bandy winnerSy Las VegaSy on tour, guys, tired, happy, excited, and good luck.

Encourage students to try to understand these from context, but be prepared to explain these words if necessary.

Ask students to read the text through fairly quickly. Deal with any vocabulary problems. Elicit the names of any other boy bands that students know about. Then deal briefly with the Grammar spot. Focus attention on the affirmative sentence and the contracted form Were.

Make sure students understand what the contracted form is in full. Make sure students understand what the contracted form is in full and that the sentence is negative. Refer students to Grammar Reference 3. Students work individually to answer the other questions before checking their answers in pairs. No, they aren't. They're in Las Vegas, in the United States. This task consolidates affirmative and negative forms of to be in a correction exercise.

Focus attention on the example answer. Say Sentence 1: Students work individually to complete the task. CD1 — 38 Play the recording, pausing at the end of each sentence to give students time to check their answers. Ask a few students to read their answers aloud. Check that they can reproduce the contrastive stress in the pairs of sentences, e. They're in the United States. They aren't in New York. They're in Las Vegas.

He isn't from Australia. He's from Canada. He isn't from Canada. He's from Brazil. They aren't very tired. They're happy and excited to be here. Interview with the band 4. CD1 — 39 Ask students to read the questions through before they listen. If necessary, review numbers to help students when picking out the ages of the characters. Play the first 8 lines of the conversation, and elicit the answer to Question 1 Ronan is Play the rest of the conversation, and have students listen for the answers to If necessary, refer them back to the text so that they can remember the names of the characters.

Ronan is Paul is 22 and Danny is Bo and Edson are Ronan is married. Paul, Danny, Bo, and Edson aren't married.

CD1 — 39 I: Now, this is your first time in Las Vegas, yes? That's right.

It's great! Now, one by one. Ronan, you're from Australia. And how old are you, Ronan? I'm No, no. I'm not from Brazil, Edson's from Brazil. I'm from Canada. Sorry, guys. So, Bo and Edson, how old are you? We're both Now, Danny and Paul. Yeah, we are. And you're from Canada? Oh, yes. With a fast-find browser function, it's quick and easy for you prepare lessons your way.

For further support, the Teacher Toolkit provides ready-made resources including new classroom presentation, video expansion, and testing materials. Still the world's most trusted adult English course - American Headway Third Edition combines a perfectly-balanced syllabus with more conversation, assessment and digital teaching and learning resources than ever before.

Its proven methodology - focus on grammar, clear vocabulary syllabus, integrated skills work - was developed by award-winning authors John and Liz Soars to give you lessons that really work in class. Download American Headway First Edition: Liz and John Soars. Oxford University Press.Refer students to Grammar Reference 4. CD1 — 29 Focus attention on the rows of numbers in Exercise 5. Ask a couple of pairs of students to practice the conversation in open pairs.

And I'm Everyday English The numbers syllabus is extended to cover Ask students to circle the contracted forms in Exercise 1. Have them substitute key words from the conversations with their own examples.