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CCNA SECURITY GUIDE PDF

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CCNA Security Official Cert Guide OMAR SANTOS, CISSP JOHN STUPPI, CCIE NO. Cisco Press East 96th Street Indianapolis. Appendix B CCNA Security (IINS) Exam Updates eBook versions of the text: a PDF version and an EPUB version for reading on your tablet. Thank you for choosing CCNA Security Study Guide. Finally, the CD contains the entire CCNA Security Study Guide in PDF format so you.


Ccna Security Guide Pdf

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ii CCNA Security Official Cert Guide. CCNA Security eBook versions of the text: a PDF version and an EPUB version for reading on your tablet. security threats. The CCNA Security certification is typically made up of two exams, . Review Guide for the IINS Certification Exam. The Extra Mile . Author: Omar Santos Pages: Publication Date Release Date: ISBN: Product Group:Book Download PDF CCNA.

Controls are categorized as preventative, deterrent, or detective.

Responses Investigators must prove motive, opportunity, and means. The system should not be shut down or rebooted before the investigation begins. Laws and Ethics Security policy must attempt to follow criminal, civil, and administrative law. Ethics refer to values that are even higher than the law. Network Attack Methodologies You must understand the command types of attacks that a network can experience. Studying these attacks is the first step to defend against them. A risk is the likelihood that a specific attack will exploit a particular vulnerability of a system.

An exploit happens when computer code is developed to take advantage of a vulnerability.

CCNA® Security Study Guide

The main vulnerabilities of systems are categorized as follows: Design errors Protocol weaknesses Software vulnerabilities Misconguration Hostile code Human factor Potential adversaries can include the following: Nations or states Terrorists Criminals Hackers Corporate competitors Disgruntled employees Government agencies Pearson Education, Inc.

Crackers criminal hackers : Hackers with a criminal intent to harm information systems. Phreakers phone breakers : Individuals who compromise telephone systems. Script kiddies: Individuals with low skill level. They do not write their own code. Instead, they run scripts written by other, more skilled attackers. Hacktivists: Individuals who have a political agenda in doing their work. Academic hackers: People who enjoy designing software and building programs with a sense for aesthetics and playful cleverness.

Hobby hacker: Focuses mainly on computer and video games, software cracking, and the modication of computer hardware and other electronic devices. How Does a Hacker Usually Think? Perform footprint analysis reconnaissance. Enumerate applications and operating systems. Manipulate users to gain access. Escalate privileges. Gather additional passwords and secrets. Install back doors. Leverage the compromised system. Defend the enclave boundaries.

Defend the computing environment. Build layered defenses. Use robust components. Use robust key management. Enumeration and Fingerprinting Ping sweeps and port scans are common practices to identify all devices and services on the network.

These reconnaissance attacks are typically the first steps in a much larger more damaging attack.

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IP Spoong IP spoofing refers to forging the source address information of a packet so that the packet appears to come from some other host in the network. IP spoofing is often the first step in the abuse of a network service, or a DoS type of attack. In IP spoofing, the attacker sends messages to a computer with an IP address that indicates the message is coming from a trusted host.

Hackers can guess or predict the TCP sequence numbers that are used to construct a TCP packet without receiving any responses from the server.

Their prediction allows them to spoof a trusted host on a local network. Blind spoong: The attacker sends several packets to the target machine to sample sequence numbers and then predicts them for the attack. Spoof attacks are often combined with IP source-routing options set in packets. Source routing is the capability of the source to specify within the IP header a full routing path between endpoints. Cisco IOS routers drop all source-routed packets if the no ip sourceroute global command is configured.

Figure shows a man-in-the-middle attack. An attacker sniffs to identify the client and server IP addresses and relative port numbers. The attacker waits to receive an ACK packet from the client communicating with the server. The ACK packet contains the sequence number of the next packet that the client expects. The attacker replies to the client using a modified packet with the source address of the server and the destination address of the client. This packet results in a reset that disconnects the legitimate client.

The attacker takes over communications with the server by spoofing the expected sequence number from the ACK previously sent from the legitimate client to the server. Following are some of the common methods: Packet snifng: Eavesdropping and logging trafc that passes over a digital network or part of a network. Port scanning: Searching a network host for open ports.

Dumpster diving: Searching through company dumpsters, looking for information that can provide a valuable source of information for hackers. Emanations capturing: Capturing electrical transmissions from the equipment of an organization to obtain information about the organization.

Wiretapping: Monitoring the telephone or Internet conversations of a third party. Social engineering: Using social skills to manipulate people inside the network to provide the information needed to access the network. Overt channels: The ability to hide information within a transmission channel based on tunneling one protocol inside another. Steganography is an example of an overt channel: hiding messages in digital pictures and digitized audio.

Covert channels: The ability to hide information within a transmission channel based on encoding data using another set of events. Phishing, pharming, and identity theft: Phishing is an attempt to criminally acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details, by masquerading as a trustworthy entity. Pharming is an attack aimed at redirecting the trafc of one website to another website.

Integrity Attacks Hackers can use many types of attacks to compromise integrity: Salami attacks: A series of minor data security attacks that together result in a larger attack. Data diddling: Changing data before or as it is input into a computer. Perhaps the trust relationship is between a system in the DMZ and a system in the inside network. Password attacks: Any attack that attempts to identify a user account, password, or both. Session hijacking: The exploitation of a valid computer session to gain unauthorized access to information or services in a computer system.

Availability Attacks Hackers can use many types of attacks to compromise availability: Botnets: A collection of software robots that run autonomously and automatically. DoS denial-of-service : An attack seeks to make a system or service unavailable after the system is sent large amounts of trafc.

The hacker then installs zombie software on them. This is a form of DoS. Electrical power: Attacks involve power loss, reduction, or spikes. Computer environment: Temperature, airow, humidity, water, and gas. Blended Threats A growing trend is for attacks to combine techniques. For example, malware that combines the characteristics of viruses, worms, Trojan horses, spyware, and others. Shut down unnecessary services and ports. Laws and Ethics Security policy must attempt to follow criminal, civil, and administrative law.

Ethics refer to values that are even higher than the law. Network Attack Methodologies You must understand the command types of attacks that a network can experience. Studying these attacks is the first step to defend against them. A risk is the likelihood that a specific attack will exploit a particular vulnerability of a system. An exploit happens when computer code is developed to take advantage of a vulnerability.

The main vulnerabilities of systems are categorized as follows: Design errors Protocol weaknesses Software vulnerabilities Misconguration Hostile code Human factor Potential adversaries can include the following: Nations or states Terrorists Criminals Hackers Corporate competitors Disgruntled employees Government agencies Pearson Education, Inc. Crackers criminal hackers : Hackers with a criminal intent to harm information systems.

Phreakers phone breakers : Individuals who compromise telephone systems. Script kiddies: Individuals with low skill level. They do not write their own code. Instead, they run scripts written by other, more skilled attackers. Hacktivists: Individuals who have a political agenda in doing their work. Academic hackers: People who enjoy designing software and building programs with a sense for aesthetics and playful cleverness.

Hobby hacker: Focuses mainly on computer and video games, software cracking, and the modication of computer hardware and other electronic devices.

How Does a Hacker Usually Think? Perform footprint analysis reconnaissance. Enumerate applications and operating systems. Manipulate users to gain access. Escalate privileges. Gather additional passwords and secrets. Install back doors. Leverage the compromised system. Defend the enclave boundaries. Defend the computing environment. Build layered defenses. Use robust components. Use robust key management. Enumeration and Fingerprinting Ping sweeps and port scans are common practices to identify all devices and services on the network.

These reconnaissance attacks are typically the first steps in a much larger more damaging attack. IP Spoong IP spoofing refers to forging the source address information of a packet so that the packet appears to come from some other host in the network. IP spoofing is often the first step in the abuse of a network service, or a DoS type of attack.

In IP spoofing, the attacker sends messages to a computer with an IP address that indicates the message is coming from a trusted host. Hackers can guess or predict the TCP sequence numbers that are used to construct a TCP packet without receiving any responses from the server. Their prediction allows them to spoof a trusted host on a local network. Blind spoong: The attacker sends several packets to the target machine to sample sequence numbers and then predicts them for the attack.

Spoof attacks are often combined with IP source-routing options set in packets. Source routing is the capability of the source to specify within the IP header a full routing path between endpoints. Cisco IOS routers drop all source-routed packets if the no ip sourceroute global command is configured. Figure shows a man-in-the-middle attack. An attacker sniffs to identify the client and server IP addresses and relative port numbers.

The attacker waits to receive an ACK packet from the client communicating with the server.

The ACK packet contains the sequence number of the next packet that the client expects. The attacker replies to the client using a modified packet with the source address of the server and the destination address of the client. This packet results in a reset that disconnects the legitimate client. The attacker takes over communications with the server by spoofing the expected sequence number from the ACK previously sent from the legitimate client to the server.

Following are some of the common methods: Packet snifng: Eavesdropping and logging trafc that passes over a digital network or part of a network. Port scanning: Searching a network host for open ports.

Dumpster diving: Searching through company dumpsters, looking for information that can provide a valuable source of information for hackers. Emanations capturing: Capturing electrical transmissions from the equipment of an organization to obtain information about the organization.

Wiretapping: Monitoring the telephone or Internet conversations of a third party. Social engineering: Using social skills to manipulate people inside the network to provide the information needed to access the network.

Overt channels: The ability to hide information within a transmission channel based on tunneling one protocol inside another. Steganography is an example of an overt channel: hiding messages in digital pictures and digitized audio. Covert channels: The ability to hide information within a transmission channel based on encoding data using another set of events.

Phishing, pharming, and identity theft: Phishing is an attempt to criminally acquire sensitive information, such as usernames, passwords, and credit card details, by masquerading as a trustworthy entity. Pharming is an attack aimed at redirecting the trafc of one website to another website. Integrity Attacks Hackers can use many types of attacks to compromise integrity: Salami attacks: A series of minor data security attacks that together result in a larger attack. Data diddling: Changing data before or as it is input into a computer.

Perhaps the trust relationship is between a system in the DMZ and a system in the inside network. Password attacks: Any attack that attempts to identify a user account, password, or both. Session hijacking: The exploitation of a valid computer session to gain unauthorized access to information or services in a computer system.

Availability Attacks Hackers can use many types of attacks to compromise availability: Botnets: A collection of software robots that run autonomously and automatically. DoS denial-of-service : An attack seeks to make a system or service unavailable after the system is sent large amounts of trafc.

CCNA Security 210-260 Certification Guide

The hacker then installs zombie software on them. This is a form of DoS. Electrical power: Attacks involve power loss, reduction, or spikes. Computer environment: Temperature, airow, humidity, water, and gas. Blended Threats A growing trend is for attacks to combine techniques.

For example, malware that combines the characteristics of viruses, worms, Trojan horses, spyware, and others. Shut down unnecessary services and ports. Use strong passwords, and change them often. Control physical access to systems. Avoid unnecessary web page inputs.

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CCNA Security 640-554 Quick Reference.pdf

Embeds 0 No embeds. No notes for slide. Book Details Author: Omar Santos ,John Stuppi Pages: Hardcover Brand: Cisco Security experts Omar Santos and John Stuppi share preparation hints and test-taking tips, helping you identify areas of weakness and improve both your conceptual knowledge and hands-on skills.

Material is presented in a concise manner, focusing on increasing your understanding and retention of exam topics.

CCNA Security Official Cert Guide presents you with an organized test-preparation routine through the use of proven series elements and techniques.You can download the Test-King products on the maximum number of 2 two computers or devices. Congure access services to process request. Cold site: Does not typically contain redundant computing equipment for example, servers and routers.

Their prediction allows them to spoof a trusted host on a local network. Summary 3. If a user has level 13 access, that user also gains access to the commands in levels 1 through